How did the Organization of Early Societies Change?

The organization of early societies changed when civilizations became more complex. Aspects of these civilizations that allowed higher changes to occur included advanced cities, specialized workers, complex institutions, record keeping and advanced technology. Advanced cities became the significant locations for civilizations to uproot. They allowed people to settle down, help the flow of trade, and improve the standard living conditions. An example of this is Mesopotamia whose fertile land encouraged migrants to settle down and form city-states. Advanced cities created the need for specialized workers and complex institutions to organize their society in a different way. Record keeping also contributed to the development of these societies. They allowed advancements made by these early people to be passed on and remain for future generations, thus changing how these societies are organized. Ultimately, these influences on societies and helped societies transgress into advanced civilizations and changed how they were organized. These factors that form civilizations originating from these early societies still remain as the basis for how people today are organized and incorporated into our world.

Primary Source

 

primary soucecuneiform-alphabet0005 primary souce2

During Mesopotamia times, scribes were very important people. They were trained to write cuneiform and record many of the languages spoken in Mesopotamia. Cuneiform was one of the first systems of writing that emerged in Sumer. It is identified by its wedge-shaped characters on clay tablets, made by using blunt reeds as styluses. Scribes were very important to the complex institutions of many civilizations after the creation of writing and fulfilled numerous functions other than simply record keeping.

 

In the primary source I made, I used the cuneiform alphabet to create a simple message on a clay slab; a similar medium used to keep records in Mesopotamia. This primary should serve as evidence of record keeping in Sumerian society.

 

Japan Final Formative Assessment

How did imperialism affect Japan?

 

As a result of imperialism in Japan, Japan’s economy boomed and their political power expanded. During the Meiji Era, the Emperor believed the “best way to counter Western influence was to modernize”[1]. The Japanese chose the aspects of Western civilization and adapted it to their own country. Soon, Japan had built a strong centralized government, military, and education was broader and more advanced than before. They also began an industrialization process that put Japan’s economy against the largest nations in the world. Once, they established their imperialistic agenda, Japan began to create an empire and effectively “drove the Chinese out of Korea”[2] in the Sino-Japanese War. This not only expanded Japan’s political power, but it also created a good source of trade for the country as well as a military port. Heightened by their newfound confidence from the Sino-Japanese War, a short while later, when Russians tried to invade Korea, igniting the Russo-Japanese War, Japan, once again, defeated a much larger power. Following this event, Japan gained more and more political power over Korea, and ultimately they imposed annexation on Korea. Overall, imperialism in Japan boosted their economy through modernization and trade, as well as their political power when they colonized and defeated other nations, allowing Japan to emerge as one of the major powers in the world

 

[1]: Textbook, Unit 6 pg. 811

[2]: Textbook, Unit 6 pg. 812

DBQ Peel Paragraph: Mughal Empire #2

Document 5 is from Baktha’war Khan, an adviser to Aurangzheb, Mughal Emperor from 1658 – 1707.

…Hindu writers have been entirely excluded from holding public offices, and all the worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people have been thrown down and destroyed in a manner which excites astonishment at the successful completion of so difficult a task. . . .”

How did the relationship change between the Mughal government and Hindus? 

Summary: The document discusses the treatment of the Hindus under Aurangzheb’s rule. During his reign, Hindu writers were excluded from holding public offices, and many of the Hindus’ temples were destroyed. These tasks were believed to be difficult to execute, but the “successful completion” excited the government.

Categories: Cultural Anthropology (4L), Political and Religion (PERSIA)

Answer: Under Akbar’s rule, Hindus were treated with toleration and equality from normal Islamic citizens. This changed when Aurangzeb took over. Hindu writers were excluded from holding public offices, and many of the Hindus’ temples were destroyed.

Outline:

P:

Aurangzeb’s reign rapidly changed the relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus.

 

Ev1:

“…Hindu writers have been entirely excluded from holding public offices”(1)

Ex1:

  • The segregation of Hindus from the Indian government implies religious conflict and inequality.
  • Contrast: Under the rule of Akbar Hindus were allowed to hold positions in the government, were treated as equals, and regarded with tolerance.

 

Ev2:

“worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people have been thrown down and destroyed”(2-3)

Ex2:

  • Indicates strong religious intolerance and aversion towards the Hindu religion, as suggested by the word choice “infidels” (2) used to describe Hindus.
  • Aurangzeb did this to show his superiority as Emperor of India and produce fear amongst the Hindus.
  • Also done to remove all the gains at rights that the Hindus had made under Akbar and attempt to make Sharia law the governing principle in the empire.

 

L:

By removing Hindus from political positions and destroying their holy temples, Aurangzeb’s rule caused bitter conflict between the Hindus and Mughals, severely changing their once tolerant relationship.

 

Peel Paragraph:

Aurangzeb’s reign rapidly changed the relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus. Unlike under Akbar’s rule, where Hindus were treated with toleration and equality like normal Islamic citizens, Aurangzeb tried to oppress a Hindu majority and impose Muslim orthodoxy, causing conflict between the two groups. For example, the document states, “…Hindu writers [were] entirely excluded from holding public offices”(1). The segregation of Hindus from the Indian government implies religious conflict and inequality. This is unlike India during the rule of Akbar where Hindus were allowed to hold positions in the government, treated as equals, and regarded with tolerance. The document further depicts Aurangzeb’s intolerance towards Hindus by stating that the “worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people [were] thrown down and destroyed”(2-3). The evidence indicates strong religious intolerance and aversion towards the Hindu religion, as suggested by the word choice “infidels” (2) used to describe Hindus. Aurangzeb did this to show his superiority as Emperor of India and produce fear amongst the Hindus. In broader terms, this was also done to remove all the gains at rights that the Hindus had made under Akbar and attempt to make Sharia law the governing principle in the empire. In the end, by removing Hindus from political positions and destroying their holy temples, Aurangzeb’s rule caused bitter conflict between the Hindus and Mughals, severely changing their once tolerant relationship.

DBQ Peel Paragraph: Mughal Empire

Document 5 is from Baktha’war Khan, an adviser to Aurangzheb, Mughal Emperor from 1658 – 1707.

…Hindu writers have been entirely excluded from holding public offices, and all the worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people have been thrown down and destroyed in a manner which excites astonishment at the successful completion of so difficult a task. . . .”

 

How did the relationship change between the Mughal government and Hindus?

Summary: The document discusses the treatment of the Hindus under Aurangzheb’s rule. During his reign, Hindu writers were excluded from holding public offices, and many of the Hindus’ temples were destroyed. These tasks were believed to be difficult to execute, but the “successful completion” excited the government.

 

Categories: Cultural Anthropology (4L), Political and Religion (PERSIA)

 

Answer: Under Akbar’s rule, Hindus were treated with toleration and equality from normal Islamic citizens. This changed when Aurangzeb took over. Hindu writers were excluded from holding public offices, and many of the Hindus’ temples were destroyed.

 

Outline:

P:

Aurangzeb’s reign rapidly changed the relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus.

 

Ev1:

“…Hindu writers have been entirely excluded from holding public offices”(1)

Ex1:

Intolerance towards the Hindus and oppressive ruling nature

 

Ev2:

“worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people have been thrown down and destroyed”(2-3)

Ex2:

Aurangzeb did this to remove all the gains Hindus had made under Akbar and attempt to make Sharia law the governing principle in the empire

 

L:

By removing Hindus from political positions and destroying their holy temples, Aurangzeb’s rule caused bitter conflict between the Hindus and Mughals, severely changing their once tolerant relationship.

 

Peel Paragraph

Aurangzeb’s reign rapidly changed the relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus. Unlike under Akbar’s rule, where Hindus were treated with toleration and equality like normal Islamic citizens, Aurangzeb tried to oppress a Hindu majority and impose Muslim orthodoxy, causing conflict between the two groups. For example, the document states, “…Hindu writers [were] entirely excluded from holding public offices”(1). This shows his intolerance towards the Hindus and oppressive ruling nature. The document further depicts Aurangzeb’s intolerance towards Hindus by stating that the “worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people [were] thrown down and destroyed”(2-3). Aurangzeb did this to remove all the gains Hindus had made under Akbar and attempt to make Sharia law the governing principle in the empire. In the end, by removing Hindus from political positions and destroying their holy temples, Aurangzeb’s rule caused bitter conflict between the Hindus and Mughals, severely changing their once tolerant relationship.

The Development of Spice Trade

Nowadays, spices are considered common goods and usually isn’t drastically expensive. However this was not the case 4 thousand years ago. The development of spice trade is one full of unique facets. By analyzing them through the different social study subjects, we can develop a better understanding of spice trade.

For instance, when we examine the history of spice trade, specifically its turning points, we can understand how its advancement has led us to the globalization of different cultures and commerce. A common example is the Silk Road.

 

Silk-Road-Map1

Silk initiated the creation of the Silk Road, connecting the world and launching global commerce on an unprecedented level. Before silk, China had little to no interaction with other countries. While China was only a sector of the many routes in the Silk Road, –as shown in the above map—the Silk Road was the first official route that connected China with other parts of the world, and soon became an economically important spice trade route.

Despite its Chinese origins, once the Silk Road was initiated, silk became a valued commodity across Europe and Asia. For instance, in Rome, silk became a popular article of clothing amongst Roman women and a symbol of wealth. These are few examples of silk found in parts of the world besides Ancient China, during its expansion.

h2_50.73
613px-IlkhanateSilkCircular
9ce843428f91978cbc1a8d9d84add335

Left: Silk and linen scarf made in India that was made for the European market | Center: Ilkhanid piece in silk, cotton and gold, found in Iran or Iraq during the early 14th century | Right: Silk and linen Eagle Dalmatic from the Holy Roman Empire from around 1300. Traces of Chinese culture can be found from the “Chinese cloud” embroidery

Chinese interactions with other countries led to the spread of many things (ex. religion, culture, and unfortunately diseases). These interactions make up what China is today as well as other affected countries, especially their economy and trade.

Another social study subject that explains the development of spice trade is culture anthropology. Before spice trade, countries had little to no interactions with each other. It wasn’t until China opened itself to the rest of the world that its culture spread to other countries. Pasta wouldn’t be the iconic Italian dish it is if Marco Polo didn’t travel to China and learn about their noodles. Vice versa, Buddhism wouldn’t be as prevalent in China as it is now without China interacting with Indian traders and explorers. In short, the culture anthropology of spice trade  explains why many countries’ cultures are what they are today.

To sum up, the Spice Trade routes not only traded spice, but also ideas and cultures between countries. We can analyze these interactions with the social study subjects to develop a better understanding of the expansion of spice trade.

Citations:

Map:

Hickman, Steven Craig. The Silk Road Map. Digital image. Alien Ecologies. WordPress, 22 Oct. 2014. Web. 10 Sept. 2015.

Primary Sources:

“Scarf with Old Testament scenes (detail) [India]” (50.73) In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History . New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2000–. http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/50.73. (October 2006)

Unknown. Circular Piece of Silk with Mongol Images. 1305. Copenhagen. Dschingis Khan Und Seine Erben (exhibition Catalogue). By Davids Samling. München: Hirmer Verlag, 2005. 288. Print.

Adlerdalmatika. Ca. 1300. Imperial Treasury, Hofburg Palace in Vienna. Wikimedia Commons. User Gryffindor, Oct. 2007. Web. 10 Sept. 2015.

Trading Assessment

Most significantly, the evidence from the simulation and reading shows how closely interrelated the 4 lenses are and explains the different workings of our world. For example, we can see how the Geography such as an area’s climate or location can affect the economics of that country. In the time of the Big 6 Era, if an island grew a spice in high demand, the economy of that island could significantly increase (supply and demand). Additionally this kind of power could also serve as a negative for the island because it puts them as a target and competitor of other spice producers, or most notably attracts colonization, which leads to turning points in our history. Another example of the interrelatedness of the 4 lenses, are how different turning points in history affected the cultural anthropology of an area. The Spice Trade Route did not exclusively trade spices, they also spread religions, ideologies, lifestyles and most unfortunately ideas. An example of this is how China, for the first time in history, opened up trade with other countries, thus allowing the spread of Chinese ideas, lifestyles, medicine etc. Overall, by exploring the different interactions of spice traders we can understand how the 4 lenses of the social studies are interrelated and further our knowledge on how the world works and why is how it is now.

Short Story: The Girlfriend Killer

Read my short story below!

The Queen’s Shopping List

While Alice is the main character in “Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland” by Lewis Carroll, I have always when been fascinated by the Queen of Hearts.

Queen_of_Hearts_(Kingdom_Hearts) queen-heartsAlice-in-wonderland-helena-bonham-carter-queen-of-hearts

Over the past few years there have been many variations of people’s visions of the Queen of hearts. For example Disney’s plump cartoon version, Tim Burton’s elvish version, or even the generic image seen on each queen of hearts poker card. In this post I show you my vision of the infamous Queen of Hearts and what I think she would wear if she lived in our time through 3 different outfits.

 

1

Outfit #1:

Top:

Bottom:

Other:

 

2

Outfit #2:

Top:

Bottom:

Others

 

3

Outfit #3:

Top:

Bottom:

Other

 

Citations:

Tim Burton Image:

Pizzahut101. Alice-in-wonderland-helena-bonham-carter-queen-of-hearts.jpg. Digital image. Villans Wikia. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Red Lipstick:

Niven, Lisa. Mac Ruby Woo Lipstick. Digital image. Vogue UK. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Necklace:

Style&co. Necklace, Silver-Tone Red Statement Necklace. Digital image. Macy’s. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Forever 21 skirt:

Lady Lace Mini Skirt. Digital image. Forever 21. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

H&M Peplum Top:

Jacquard-weave Peplum Top. Digital image. H&M. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Heart Skirt:

Black Hearts Printed Womens Fashion Sexy Pleated Skirt. Digital image. Pink Queen. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

H&M Crop Top:

Cropped Off-the-shoulder Top. Digital image. H&M. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Macy’s Red Pants:

Style&co. Tummy-Control Cuffed Capri Jeans. Digital image. Macy’s. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Christian Louboutin

New Simple Pump. Digital image. Christian Louboutin. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Kate Spade Earrings:

Kate spade new york “Dear Valentine” Heart Stud Earrings. Digital image. Amazon. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Ruby Earrings:

Sterling Silver Cubic Zirconia Heart Ruby Earrings Studs 6 mm Red Color 1.5 carats/pair. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Tarte Blush:

Amazonian clay 12-hour blush. Digital image. Tarte Cosmetics. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 May 2015.

 

Converse Low Tops:

Chuck Taylor Classic Colors. Digital image. Converse. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2015.

 

Off the shoulder crop top:

LILLY OFF THE SHOULDER CROP BARDOT TOP. Digital image. Boohoo. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2015.

 

Felicia Ballet Flats:

Felicia. Digital image. Sam Edelman. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2015.

 

Heart Snapback:

Red October Digital Love Snapback. Digital image. Stereo Type. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 May 2015.

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