Formative PEEL Assessment

As early humans discovered more and more tools that could help them and eventually settled down and started forming complex cities, the organisation of the society begun to change and become more and more complex.  The first humans were solitary hunter-gatherers, but as they started settling down, farming, and forming societies, the structure of society eventually grew more and more complex and more people were settled down and more crafts were taken up. As the societies got more complex, there were more specialised workers and social classes to divide them.  In the beginning, humans were solitary hunter-gatherers who rarely worked in groups of more than two or three, and migrated constantly, travelling to wherever food was most abundant. These people did not have a social structure or stay anywhere long enough to establish any settlements. Later, these early humans started crafting more and more tools to help them survive, and this gave the Cro-Magnons the ability to hunt large creatures and kill prey at greater distances, which may have enforced teamwork. Later, during the Neolithic Revolution, early humans started farming their own crops and domesticating animals. Catal Huyuk is an example of a city who benefited from this. The people of Catal Huyuk were able to settle and start a city. This city was able to cultivate large amounts of wheats and grains, and looks after large herds of cows and sheep. With abundance of harvest, the city was able to support skilled workers, such as weavers and potters. All of this eventually led to record keeping. There were also priests and temples in this city, and the social classes became more and more distinct as more people joined. The first humans were solitary hunter-gatherers, but as society became more and more complex with the development of cities, agriculture, and livestock cultivation, the organisation of the societies also changed as people started living in larger groups and more social classes were created.

 

 

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies February 4, 2016

Asian Studies PEEL

As the agricultural revolution provided a means to control and supply a stable quantity of food, the early humans were able to reproduce freely and sustain the future generations, leading to a population increase that will affect the world for millennia to come. This freedom meant that the early humans were able to repopulate at a faster pace, and instead of simply maintaining a population, there were able to expand it. This helped with farming, hunting, and the basic survival of their kind. During the 5 thousand years of the agricultural revolution, the population on Earth went from nearly 5 to almost 90 million people, as opposed to the 5 million increase in the previous 15 thousand years. As the population grew and the people settled down, the first societies and villages were formed around fertile crescents. This created new settlements are started the large cities that we live in today. The ability to reproduce and increase the population freely has shaped the world we live in today by providing a stable workforce and creating the first settlements, and is no doubt the most major effect of the Agricultural Revolution.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies  Tagged:  , , January 18, 2016

CREATE Project

“Elidere”

I’d be better off dead.

But I’m a coward and I can’t do it.

Every time, I end up pouring the glass down the drain, clutching to safety, or throwing the pills away.

The thorn of the rose I’m holding pricks my finger, and I welcome the stinging pain. I press my finger against the frosted window, and the chill bites my finger, numbing me for a second, but then all the emotions come back, a jumbled mess.

Blood twists down my arm like a serpentine tattoo.

I look around the house. My house. The high, palatial ceilings, the elegant furniture, the priceless paintings, the joyful pictures on the mantel, smiling back at me from another era, another era when you were here.

The neighbors whisper and talk when they think I’m not listening. I don’t blame them. I would too if it were someone else. What would you say about a ghost of a girl who lives alone with a closet full of identical white dresses?

You know, I used to care. I used to listen to what they say, but now, I couldn’t care less. You taught me that.

You taught me that if people didn’t accept me for who I was, then they weren’t worth my time. And so I stopped pretending to be someone I wasn’t. That’s why you left me – right? I loved you, you know? I loved you like the sun loved the moon, like melancholy loved hope.

Suddenly I can’t stand to be in the house – my house, anymore. I stomp on the rose with my heel and the sickly sweet scent pervades the room. I have to – I need to get outside. Away from this ghostly mansion. I don’t care that it’s raining. I wouldn’t care if there were a wildfire outside. I need to get out.

I run outside, and let myself drown in the agony. I found that if you immerse yourself in enough pain, you’ll eventually stop feeling it. And that’s the goal, because I’m tired of feeling. Pain doesn’t get you anywhere and all it does is destroy you, lodging in the deepest pits of your heart, and not stopping until it has destroyed everything in its path, not stopping until you are a ghost of your former self. And that is who I am now.

But eventually I have to stop. I am too tired, and the rain is pouring down too hard to see anything in front of me. Crying out, I stop running and sink to my knees in my dress, soaked to the bone. I kneel there, on the street, and pain gets into me the way blows can’t. I can imagine them talking about the phantom of a girl in the white dress crying in the rain, but I no longer care. Now, I’m nearly out of hope, and I’m left with no reason to keep holding on, tempted by the urge to let go and break every second of every day.

Are you happy now?

Because if you are, I know that I did not go through all this pain for nothing. As long as you are happy, my happiness comes second. As long as you are happy, I don’t matter.

Some call me crazy for thinking that, but truthfully, they just don’t know love. Or commitment. Or the days of endless pining and wishful thinking. They don’t know what it feels like to be hung up on someone they loved for so long, never able to let go, never able to move on.

They don’t understand. None of them ever will. Some things are just too painful for their innocent minds to grasp. They will never know how much I loved you, or what you did to me when you left. You became a part of me, a part that I treasured and needed. You were the one thing that I couldn’t live without. Next to you, air was optional. When you left, you didn’t just take my heart. You took my soul, my spirit, everything that kept me alive and made me myself. It was all gone. And you aren’t coming back anytime soon, so I’m stuck in this Purgatory, unable to feel anything but pain. Maybe I should’ve listened to all the skeptics that doubted you. But I don’t regret anything I’ve done. I just regret what you’ve done–but then, that’s not for me to regret, but for you to. Do you regret what you’ve done?

I wasn’t always like this, and you would know that more than anyone. I was once beautiful, charming, and carefree. Your sisters warned me, she told me that you were no good, and that you would use me and then toss me away, like you did everyone else. I didn’t believe her. Before I met you, I could charm a snake. And I did. You. But you did things a snake couldn’t. A snake could only kill me. You did worse.

A door opens and a neighbor peers out at me. “Are you all right?” she asks me. I swap her squeaky, high-pitched voice for your smooth, low one. Asking not just out of politeness, but because you actually cared. Maybe that was why I loved you. I don’t know now, not after you broke me to pieces and then left me when I needed you the most.

I remember when you asked me those words when I first met you, forever ago. I was destroyed then, too, like I am now. But I patched myself up again, didn’t I?

I lift my face to the sky, and realize that the rain has stopped, and a wide, colorful rainbow was spanning the sky; the type of rainbow you would always drag me outside to watch.

“I am now,” I reply, and this time, it was the truth.

 

Add comment Posted in  Uncategorized December 7, 2015

Final Formative Assessment

With the increase of Japan’s military and diplomatic influence in the world, the conflict with other nations and territories also escalated. In 1942, when Japan targeted Midpoint Island, containing a key American airfield located around 1,500 miles away from Hawaii, the American army with Admiral Chester Nimitz quickly brought forces and annihilated the Japanese troops there. The Japanese were already stationed there are were prepared to attack, however, in 1940, the Americans, worried about further attacks from Japan, deciphered their military code, leading to a one-sided massacre at the Battle of Midway. Due to the ever-increasing strength of the Japanese army and the fear that they would conquer Pacific Islands, the American military put more effort into cracking the codes of the Japanese and decided to physically interfere and battle the Japanese. As the Japanese gained more power and started to try and take over American military bases, the American grew weary and stuck back. After the Pearl Harbour attack, the Americans were anxious to avenge their losses, and together with the Australians, they sent 16 B -25 bombers under the command of Lieutenant Colonel James H. Doolittle to bomb Tokyo and other major Japanese cities. The more land and power that the Japanese gained, the more unrest there was between the threatened countries. This showed in the form on an attack in this example. As the Japanese grew stronger and conquered more land, America perceived them as dangerous and created conflict. The stronger Japan grew politically and militarily, the more conflict they were thrown with with other nations that perceived the strength of the Japanese as a threat.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies  Tagged:  , , , November 24, 2015

DBQ PEEL Paragraph (2)

P: The once amicable relationship between the Mughul government and the Hindus have changed into one of contempt, as seen from Baktha’war Khan’s writings.

Evidence:

  • Khan calls the Hindus “infidels” and “infamous”

Explanation: Contempt, hatred, they once had power

  • Mentions that Hindu writers are being excluded from the government as they “have been entirely excluded from holding public offices”.

Explanation: Separation, unfair, hate them

  • Moreover, Khan describes the success of  the destruction of temples, as well as the manner of destruction causing “astonishment at the successful completion of so difficult a task.”

Explanation: Contempt, hatred for them, no respect. Akbar/Aurangzeb difference

L: Though Akbar put in effort to promote equality, Hindus were ultimately still treated like less than other people, as seen from the contempt shown in Khan’s article.

 

 

The once amicable relationship between the Mughul government and the Hindus have changed into one of contempt, as seen from Baktha’war Khan’s writings. By calling the hindus “infidels” and “infamous”, Khan is openly stating his contempt and disrespect for them. Calling them “infamous” also implies that the Hindus hold influence or power in the Empire. The equality between the hindus and Islamics, which Akbar had promoted, has been completely shattered. Khan also states that the Hindus “have been entirely excluded from holding public offices”, showing unfairness and inequality towards them. Because the Hindus would be able to exert more influence if they held office, the Empire banned them from having any influence, showing that they are a threat. Moreover, Khan describes the success of  the destruction of temples, as well as the manner of destruction causing “astonishment at the successful completion of so difficult a task”. By stating that the destruction of sacred places is a take to be astonished at, he is blatantly disrespecting their religion. Moreover, by mentioning the manner of destruction, Khan is clearly showing the contempt that he, and the Islamic feel towards the Hindus. Though Akbar put in effort to promote equality, Hindus were ultimately still treated like less than other people, as seen from the contempt shown in Khan’s article.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies  Tagged:  , , , , , , October 20, 2015

DBQ PEEL Paragraph

P: The once amicable relationship between the Mughul government and the Hindus have changed into one of contempt, as seen from Baktha’war Khan’s writings.

E: Khan calls the Hindus “infidels” and “infamous”, and mentions that Hindu writers are being excluded from the government as they “have been entirely excluded from holding public offices”. Moreover, Khan describes the success of the destruction of temples, as well as the manner of destruction causing “astonishment at the successful completion of so difficult a task.”

E: The relationship between the government and the Hindus has changed from the amicable interaction laid out by Akbar, to a rivalry and discrimination. Akbar promoted equality, however, during Aurangzheb’s rule, this equality was demolished, and Hindus became less than the theory citizens.

L: Though Akbar put in effort to promote equality, Hindus were ultimately still treated like less than other people, as seen from the contempt shown in Khan’s article.

 

The once amicable relationship between the Mughul government and the Hindus have changed into one of contempt, as seen from Baktha’war Khan’s writings. Khan calls the Hindus “infidels” and “infamous”, and mentions that Hindu writers are being excluded from the government as they “have been entirely excluded from holding public offices”, which demonstrates the inequality within the government. Moreover, Khan describes the success of the destruction of sacred temples, as well as the manner of destruction causing “astonishment at the successful completion of so difficult a task.” The relationship between the government and the Hindus has changed from the amicable interaction laid out by Akbar, to rivalry and discrimination. Akbar promoted equality during his reign, however, during Aurangzheb’s rule, this equality was demolished, and Hindus became less than the theory citizens. Though Akbar put in effort to promote equality, Hindus were ultimately still treated like less than other people after his rule, as seen from the contempt shown in Khan’s article.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies  Tagged:  , , , , October 12, 2015

The Spice Trade Through the Lenses of Social Studies

71aa4bfc4ca010cb379cd7e89fa68f60 Calicut_1572(Please click on image to enlarge)

Understanding how the world works can be a challenging feat. To fully understand, or even attempt to understand the phenomenon that happen, inspecting them through different lenses of social studies such as history, geography, economics, and cultural anthropology can give us a clearer, or completely new view on subjects that we are trying to understand. Using these four lenses has given us a clearer understanding of the Spice Trade, and how different aspects of the world impacted each other and the big picture.  

In the Spice Trade, history and geography greatly impacted each other, as well as the overall outcome of the trade. Many decisions and routes explored in the spice trade were based off of history and superstition, as well as the known geography of the terrain. There are many examples of how history and geography have co-impacted the spice trade, but a prominent example would be Vasco de Gama’s discovery of a new trade route (please refer to map above). The previous trade routes discovered by the Kingdom of Axum (now Ethiopia and Eritrea) through the Red Sea were used by pioneer traders, but this route was becoming unpopular compared to the overland trading routes discovered by the Arab traders. However, these overland routes were still inefficient compared to what was discovered in the European Age of Discovery. The route to Europe from the Indian Ocean was pioneered by the explorer Vasco de Gama in 1498, resulting in the creation of some of the largest new maritime routes for trade, as seen in the map above. This discovery was made upon the basis of previous European sailors who had gone on a similar route, but had not succeeded in connecting these two areas. An European sailor, Bartolomeu Dias, had gone on a similar route, but had turned back at the dangerous terrain of the Great Fish River, while de Gama forged on. This terrain is what decided the victory of de Gama’s voyage, and the failure of Dias’s voyage many years back. The success of his voyage and the discovery of a more efficient trade route is what opened up the opportunity for the Europeans to explore and take advantage of the Indies. Calicut was one of the first trading ports to open to Europeans, and was a commercial center, as seen from Georg Braun’s Civitates Orbis Terrarium(please refer to above image), made in 1572. Because of these opportunities, the Europeans started to take advantage of the spice trade and the value of black pepper. However, history and geography were not the only aspects that impacted the Spice Trade. 

Economics and cultural anthropology have also made large impacts both on each other, and on the spice trade. They have been driven by each other, and have changed the way the spice trade turned out. Artefacts and spices from different cultures sold for incredibly high prices, and in each for more patrons, many religions travelled the routes of the spice trade. The most obvious way the economic factor impacted the spice trade would be that the spice trade exists purely because of the hope of economic gain. Many countries and places, such as Batavia, treated spices like treasures, heavily taxed them, and “heavy penalties [were] inflicted on [the] cultivators who dispose of their produce to private individuals” (Gullick 1) . Because of the hopes of discovering new trade routes or finding cheaper prices for the ever-inflating prices for spices, many explorers set sail to try and find new lands. Not only did they find new lands, they also found new cultures and religions to bring back with them. Hindu and Buddhist religious establishments of Southeast Asia came to be associated with economic activity and commerce as patrons, or investors, entrusted large funds which would later be used to benefit local economy by estate management, craftsmanship and promotion of trading. Buddhism, in particular, traveled alongside the maritime trade, promoting coinage, art and literacy. Also, Islam spread throughout the East, reaching Southeast Asia around the 10th century. Through Vasco de Gama’s trade route, Indian merchants involved in spice trade took their cuisine to Southeast Asia, notably present day Malaysia and Indonesia, where spice mixtures and curry became popular. Europeans also introduced culinary skills such as baking, to India. These skills were very valuable in foreign places. For example, baked goods in India were priced very high, and so were Indian textiles in Europe. This is also an example of how further away things are, the more likely they were to go through more hands, and therefore, have higher price inflation, which we found out during the Spice Simulation. The exchange of culture also boosted trade between these two places, and the profits from the trade between the Middle East and Europe were some of the highest in the spice trade. Over the following centuries, countless groups grappled for control of the spice trade. In the mid-13th century, Venice emerged as the primary trade port for spices headed to Europe. Venice became prosperous by charging huge taxes, and without direct access to the Middle East trading ports, the European people could do nothing else but pay the unreasonable prices they were charged. A larger scale effect of the economic impact the Spice Trade had would be that the profit that Europe made drove the world from the Middle Ages into modern society – and ushered in an age of European domination in the East. In its day, the spice trade was the largest industry in the world: it established and destroyed empires, led to the discovery of continents, and in many ways helped lay the foundation for the modern world. Pepper and cinnamon are no longer luxuries for most of us, and spices have lost the status and allure that once placed them alongside jewels and metals as the world’s most valuable items. However, the history remains, as does the wonderful variety of exotic tastes, colors and smells that once made spices so valuable. Through the four lenses of Social Studies, we are able to understand more clearly what the spice trade was, and the impact that it had on the world.

Works Cited

“Silk Road Spice Merchant.” Silk Road Spice Merchant. Web. 9 Sept. 2015.

“Silk Road Spice Merchant.” Silk Road Spice. Silk Road Spice Merchant. Web. 9 Sept. 2015. <http://www.silkroadspices.ca/history-of-spice-trade>.

“Spice Trade.” Encyclopedia Britannica. Web. 9 Sept. 2015. <http://global.britannica.com/topic/spice-trade>.

“The Spice Trade.” Spice Trade. Gale – Cengage Learning. Web. 9 Sept. 2015. <http://ic.galegroup.com/ic/whic/ReferenceDetailsPage/ReferenceDetailsWindow?zid=baa007a0e932426910aa7af939b0405f&action=2&catId=&documentId=GALE|CX3403702770&userGroupName=tlc199095657&jsid=56816afd1c5b8cab8945a2f9935d4e42>.

Whipps, By. “How the Spice Trade Changed the World.” LiveScience. TechMedia Network, 12 May 2008. Web. 9 Sept. 2015. <http://www.livescience.com/7495-spice-trade-changed-world.html>.

Segade, Irene. “Big Era Six – The Convergency.” (n.d.): n. pag. World History for Us All. UCLA. Web. <http://worldhistoryforusall.sdsu.edu/units/six/panorama/06_panorama.pdf>.

Gullick, J.M. Adventures and Encounters: Europeans in South-East Asia. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995. Print.

Europe and the Age of Exploration. n.d. Web. 10 September 2015. <http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/expl/hd_expl.htm>.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies September 10, 2015

Asia Through the 4 Lenses

(10 minutes) Understanding how the world works can be a difficult thing. However, trying to understand it from the perspectives of history, geography, economics, and cultural anthropology can give us a completely new view on the things that we are looking at. In the Traders simulation, we understood how economics impacted our lives. The more hands that a certain object goes through, the more the price inflates from the starting price. Sometimes, we ran out of money, or we didn’t have enough money, so we would sell our remaining spices at high prices, but then other people didn’t want to but them. Then, we had to find a price that suited both us and the consumer, even if it means that we may not make as much money as we wanted to. In reality, the compromises that the merchants and traders made might have threatened their survival. In the spice simulation, we got to understand how supply and demand impact the prices, and what some of the misfortunes farmers, merchants, and traders go through. The economic earnings of each group during the simulations also go us to realize that even though they are part of the supply chain, they may not be making a lot of money, some may even be losing money. We got to understand how geography impacted trade, and how the further away something came from, the more hands it will pass through. We understood that there might be complications along that way that may result in a shortage or lack of spices. This also impacts cultural anthropology because material things are not the only things that are traded. Ideas, religions, and languages are also shared. Because of this, our history has turned out the way it has. From first spreading humans around the world, and then spreading the Black Death, to the birth of Christianity in Asia, there is no doubt that geography has impacted our history.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies August 24, 2015

Spices Reading Question

I like the fact that we got to scan the document before we got to read it in detail because it first gave me a vague idea about what might be in the article, and gave me an idea of what questions I might find answers to in the reading. The fact that we got to answer each other’s questions, and questions that we’ve never though of, made us read the document in a lot more detail, and me much more thorough in reading that we normally would have been if we were just reading to ourselves.

Add comment Posted in  Asian Studies August 24, 2015

An Iron Heart Becomes Flesh and Blood

Click image to make larger:

Screen Shot 2015-05-31 at 8.50.30 PM

 

The found poem that I created for A Dance With Dragons by George RR Martin shows the conflict that a protagonist, Daenerys Targaryen endured, and how she overcame it. The dragons used to be her only source of support, but she became friends with Ned, and he helped her get over her fear of betrayal.

Daenerys has shut herself out from the rest of the world and turned her heart to stone because she was afraid of being hurt. She had nobody but her dragons because she was a “lonely [girl] without anybody in the world, and had a broken heart fixed with iron”(Martin 788). After going through so much trauma in her life, with her brother trying to sell her for money, and gaining ten enemies for every friend she makes, she has “put up an iron shield around her heart, vowing to never let anyone get close to it again”(Martin 453).

After being betrayed by a “friend”, Daenerys started only trusting her dragons, because she believed that they were the only things in the world that wouldn’t harm or betray her. The picture in the background is of a dragon spreading its wings, and rising on its own feet, no longer chained down by Daenerys. This also represents how she realises that the things that she has put the most trust in and treat like her pets and children are grown up. The picture in the background also conveys her sadness and fear of the ones she trusted leaving her, much like the person standing in from of the dragon in the picture.

Bibliography:

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/post-traumatic-stress-disorder

Add comment Posted in  Humanities  Tagged:  , , , , , , , , May 31, 2015

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