Asian Studies: How Did the Organization of Early Societies Change?

The organization of human life changed from the nomadic way of life, with little consistency of food source, to the agricultural way of life, with a surplus of food, and later, into a complex and modern civilization. At the beginning of human life, people were mainly hunter-gathers. This means they relied on killing animals and collecting fruits as a food source. The amount of food one gathers varies differently depending on the the time of year, with a lot of food in the summer and little during winter. This way of living is not consistent, and in order for our humans to develop and improve their way of living over time, they needed a consistent food source. This brought the agricultural way of living, “A sustainable way of farming during the spring, summer and autumn seasons” (dailylife.abcclio.com). This way, farmers grew crops during the three seasons and have a surplus of food during the winter, and this process cycles for every year. Like this, the people not only have a consistent food source, but also a surplus for the other people. With enough food, the population boomed. And with more food, specialized workers became more common, since not everyone has to farm to stay alive. With specialized workers, comes more artifacts, and with more artifacts, trading was possible. Also with the larger population, an institution was required to manage the people. With this institution, the way of writing and the way of recording was invented and used. The surplus of food, the specialized workers, the trading, the institution, and the language all come together to form what we call today – a civilization. And all this complex and modern way of living started with our ancient ancestors, who killed animals and collected fruits in order to survive.

 

A long way huh?

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DBQ PEEL

P: The relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus have worsened under the rule of Aurangzeb.

Ev: “Hindu writers have been entirely excluded from holding public offices,” wrote Baktha’war Khan, an adviser to Aurangzeb

Ex: The exclusion of Hindu writers from public offices suggests the unfairness towards the Hindus and the bad relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus.

Ev: “all the worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people have been thrown down and destroyed.”

Ex: The destruction of the temples indicates the government’s hatred towards the Hindus. The writer of this passage, the king’s adviser, used the word “infamous” to describe the Hindus. Which again reveals the dislike of the Hindus.

L: Ultimately, the exclusion of the Hindus from public office, the destruction of the Hindu temples, and the negative diction states the aggravating relationship between he Mughal government and the Hindus.

 

 

The relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus have worsened under the rule of Aurangzeb. “Hindu writers have been entirely excluded from holding public offices,” wrote Baktha’war Khan, an adviser to Aurangzeb. The exclusion of Hindu writers from public offices suggests the unfairness towards the Hindus and the bad relationship between the Mughal government and the Hindus.  Baktha’war Khan said in the same passage: “all the worshiping places of the infidels [Hindus] and the great temples of these infamous people have been thrown down and destroyed.” The destruction of the temples indicates the government’s hatred towards the Hindus. The writer of this passage, the king’s adviser, used the word “infamous” to describe the Hindus. Which again reveals the government’s dislike of the Hindus. Ultimately, the exclusion of the Hindus from public office, the destruction of the Hindu temples, and the negative diction, concludes the aggravating relationship between he Mughal government and the Hindus.

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John Green’s video vs.section one of the text book

A portion of John Green’s Crash Course video is on Asoka, Hinduism and Buddhism. While a section of the textbook also talks about Asoka and his introduction of religion to India. The reason that Asoka is so famous is that he introduced a religion where it gave not only Asoka but the whole country a new point of view. This move is significant because, in both the video and the text, all they relate to Asoka is the introduction of Buddhism. Asoka’s introduction of Buddhism is so important that John Green spent all his time talking about him and did not even mention the founder of the Mauryan Empire and its heir. In short, the video and the text are connected by Asoka, and the religion he introduced to India.

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Asian Studies Summative Assessment

Prompt: Discuss how multiple social studies subjects are analyzed together to develop and understanding of Spice Trade.

Multiple lenses of social studies are interacted to form the world we live in today. In this assignment, I will discuss some of these lenses in terms of the Spice Trade.

Economy and Geography are interacted in the spice trade when the merchants tried to mix fake peppercorns into the real ones. In the 1600’s, the demand for spices was really high in Europe. “Coffee, pepper, and sugar. The three articles most in demand for European consumption” (Batavia Early). Since Europe did not have the geography nor the knowledge for growing spices, they had to ship spices from South East Asia. Which made spices really rare and expensive. With such high demand from the rich ones, the merchants knew the supply was limited. They increased the supply by mixing in fake peppercorns, which made the business a lot more profitable. We saw this in the “Spice It Up” reading, “Any of whom may mix a bit of something with it making a few fake peppercorns.” (P22 R. R. Palmer). Economy and Geography are big parts of the Spice Trade, but they do not make up the whole definition of Spice Trade, whereas Cultural Anthropology and Economy take up smaller parts, they are important factors of the Spice Trade’s existence.

Cultural Anthropology and Economy are present when famous Portugal trader Vasco da Gama reached Calicut, India. He was the first to sail from Europe to Calicut by going around Africa in one trip. (Shown in map) He was there for two reasons, “For Christ and spices!” (1 the Economist). “Gold and Christians” (Green). Famous sailor Christopher Columbus was funded by the royal family to go the Indonesia for the same two reasons, for spices and proselytization. “He was able to convince Ferdinand and Isabella of Spain to fund his expedition by promising riches and conversions of the natives” (Green). Spices, gold and proselytization are tightly bonded to each other, without the spices, there would be no gold and riches, without gold and proselytization; there would be no point of making the journey. Converting Christians and finding spices are common goals of traders and sailors, and they both fit under the Cultural Anthropology and Economy lenses. Economy, Geography and Cultural Anthropology are important lenses not only in the spice trade, but also in the world we live in today.

“Columbus, De Gama, and Zheng He! 15th Century Mariners. Crash Course: World History #21.” YouTube. YouTube, n.d. Web. 08 Sept. 2015.

From J. M. Gullick, Adventures and Encounters: Europeans in South-East Asia, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1995.

 

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Art Composition Project Reflection

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The steps that I take to make my composite drawing are as the follows. I first visualize what I am going to draw, by combining the teacher’s criteria with my own ideas. I learned from looking at other student’s drawings online that in order to be successful at this project, I have to have a variety of shapes and sizes, overlapping drawings, and a bright colored background. These rules plus the teacher’s criteria combined together makes this beautiful drawing. (I think so!) After visualizing, I go straight to drawing using a black pen. If I want thicker parts I use a sharpie. I started with the smaller objects in front, with a thin black pen. I try to choose a variety of shapes, for example the sharp pin and the round hat. After finishing the smaller objects in front, I move to the bigger objects in the back, the leaves. Without the leaves my drawing looks very empty, there is a lot of space between the small objects. I thought I needed something that takes up a lot of space without covering up my other drawings, and that’s why I drew the big leaves in the background. After finishing my drawings, I colored the background with acrylic paint. I choose green because it is a bright and matches with the leaves. I had to find out the hard way that the green paint was very thin and does not fully cover up the white paper. Ms. Z suggested me to add some white paint to my green to make it thicker. And that’s what I did. I started by coloring the outline first, then it would be less trouble later coloring the rest of the negative space.

After this project I learned that you could always fix up your mistakes. When I drew the captain’s hat, I messed up the sidelines and accidentally drew them too shallow. I was going to change it to some wires but Evan suggested me to keep going with it. He said he could not tell the mistake just looking at the drawing. I continued with it and changed the mistake lines into some cross-hatching. The hat drawing turned out to be better than I thought, thanks to Evan Sim.

The most challenging part of this project was the cross-hatchings. My cross-hatching always made the shape look 2D. An example is the pin. Later I learned that you have to make the crosshatches parallel to the sides of the shape, and I tried it on my leaves, which made it look much better.

I especially enjoyed the coloring part of this project. I liked how adding white to a thin green can completely change the property of the paint. This project reminded me of Andy Warhol’s paintings with weird bright colors. Because we are painting the negative space instead of the positive space, as we usually do.

 

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crash course video and the 4 lenses of asian studies

The crash course video relate to economy because it is all about trading with other countries and making money. Without the money aspect this all would not have happened. In John Green’s video he said, Zheng He sailed the seas to build relationships with other countries. China did not need anymore resources, all Zheng He wanted was good relationships with other countries so China could have good trades with them in the future. He sailed to places around the world which we thought were making friends, but really he was trying to make money in the long term.

This video is related to geography because without any knowledge of geography, there will not be any trades with lands far away. Spices were grown in SE Asia because it had the only suitable geography. To sail to SE Asia from Europe without any knowledge of geography would be like to drive from Beijing to Shanghai without using a map. It is impossible.

This video is also related to Cultural Anthropology because it is the the spread of religion. Christopher Columbus had three tasks as he sailed to “Indonesia”. To bring back spices, to bring back gold, and to convert the people into Christianity. When he came back from what we call today the United States of America, he did not bring back spices, nor gold, but he converted a whole bunch of people into Christians. This is like saying religion is more important than Spices and Gold.

Lastly, this video is related to history because this the making of history. History is defined as “finding pattern in life.” well this is what trading with other countries is all about. First you find patterns in the weather, to help you as you sail to your destination. Then you find patterns in trading, to buy with low prices and sell with higher prices. When you look at the three famous captain, Zheng He, Vasco, and Columbus, they all share the same pattern of converting religion, finding new routes to new spice islands, and to make a lot of money.

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How the world works

By considering the evidence presented in the Traders simulation, and the ‘Spice it up’ reading done in class, explain how the 4 lenses of the social studies interact to help us understand how the world works. Max 1 paragraph.

 

Geography, History, Cultural Anthropology and Economics interact and helps me understand how the world works because they are the included in all areas of life, especially this trading unit. For example the three stages of trading. The farmers are related to the geography, because the crops depend on the geography to grow, the weather, temperature, altitude… The traders/middleman are sailing across the world because of the economics, they are doing it for the money. They merchants are also doing their job to make a living. With trades going from Europe to SE Asia and back to Europe creates a spread of Cultural Anthropology, which then translates into different patterns which is the definition of history. These four basic factors are not only represented by trading, but every human interaction in this world.

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learning card

What did/do you enjoy about this task? Why?

I liked how there is so many different variety of questions and so many different point of views. I answered some of them and read some answers to my questions.

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People of Sparks Found Poem

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Show how a type of conflict  is developed or intensifies up until the climax of the story.

In Jeanne Duprau‘s People of Sparks, refugees of Ember have settled in the village of Sparks. The Sparks promised the People of Ember to feed and shelter them, in return, the people of Ember have to help with the farming of the Sparks. The Sparks have emptied the food storages in order to support the extra 400 people, but the people of Ember did not do much in return. They spent most of the days in the farm, but since they come from under ground, they do not know the basics of farming. Food soon began to run short, and “the cabbage corp is going to be smaller than expected.”(112 Duprau) since “worms has gotten into it.” (112) The found poem above shows the complaints of the citizens of Ember. Some people from Ember tried to appreciate the kindness of the sparks, even with the little food. But others wanted to fight back. Winter is coming soon, will the two villages work together and fill the storage houses as much as they can, or will they go to war, and kick one of the village out in order to survive.

DuPrau, Jeanne. The People of Sparks. New York: Random House, 2004. Print.

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math ice cream project

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