Sitting On the Train Tracks

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This photo taken by Dorothea Lange explicitly shows the poverty during the particular era, which connects to the historical context of Of Mice and Men. The overall mies-en-sen of this photo emphasises the poverty of the people in the middle. The migrants are the dominant element, as the subject and the surrounding objects are the most easily noticed elements in this piece. Even the leading lines created by train tracks highlights the people. This effects draw attention to how dirty and worn out their clothes are, representative of their poverty. Their faces are very depressed, and are all facing the ground. One child is covering her face, as if she is timid or ashamed of herself.

This reflects time period of The Great Depression, when many Americans were migrating to the West for a new home and a job. It is also when Of Mice and Men takes place, and is conveyed successfully through the elements of this photo.

Tips for 8th Grade

1. Don’t procrastinate.

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2. Be organized.

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3. Finish as much as you can during class.

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4. In humanities, you will read: Fahrenheit 451, Animal Farm, Maggot Moon or Nothing But the Truth, and books from your revolution.

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5. In science, you will learn: biology, astronomy, chemistry and evolution.

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Good luck!

Polymer Journal 2: Developing Solutions

We decided to use experiments in science class as a reference to our polymer design. During the last few classes, we made Gloop, Boogers and Super Slime out of different materials. Gloop was made using glue and borax solution. Boogers was made out of laundry starch, and Super Slime was a concoction of PVA solution and borax solution.

 

Prototype 1

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Ingredients:

  • 1cm of glue
  • 13mL of borax
  • 7mL of water
  • 10mL of PVA solution
  • (Optional) Food coloring

Our design goal was rather like a mixture of Gloop and Super Slime. So we decided to mix glue, water, borax solution and PVA solution. The first prototype we made out of the ingredients above was very firm and hard to break, but we found it too sticky. So we decided to take a risk and add laundry starch and see what happened.

 

Prototype 2

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Ingredients:

  • 1 spoonful of glue
  • 10mL of borax
  • 5mL of water
  • 10mL of PVA solution
  • 10mL laundry starch
  • (Optional) Food coloring

The second prototype we made was more like Boogers, as it was very stretchy and gooey. The concoction did not mix very well together, so we couldn’t shape it into anything. Although it was very flexible, the prototype was too sticky for our purpose. We thought that laundry starch was causing the stickiness, so we decided to remove laundry starch for our next prototype.

 

Prototype 3

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Ingredients:

  • 1cm of glue
  • 10mL of borax
  • 5mL of water
  • 10mL of PVA solution
  • 2 spoons of corn starch
  • (Optional) Food coloring

Ingredients for prototype 3 was identical to prototype 1, except corn starch was added. Therefore the texture was very similar to prototype 1 – firm and sticky. One observation we made was that it fit other objets very easily. When placed on the table, the prototype sunk onto the table after some time.

 

Prototype 4

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Ingredients:

  • 10mL water
  • 5 spoons of corn starch
  • 10mL of borax

For prototype 4, we decided to think from the start with corn starch and borax. It had a very similar texture to a mixture of water and corn starch, but thicker. Its unique characteristic of turning from solid to liquid and from liquid to solid stayed the same. However because of that the prototype did not stay in place properly, which made it useless.

 

Prototype 5

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Ingredients:

  • 1cm of glue
  • 10mL of borax
  • 10mL of water
  • 1 spoonful of corn starch
  • (Optional) Food coloring

Prototype 5 was a success. It was firm, flexible, and easily went back in shape. Nevertheless, we found a small problem. It was too watery with water and too sticky without. The problem was solved after drying the moisture out of the polymer in the sun.

 

Prototype 6

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Ingredients:

  • 1cm of glue
  • 10mL of borax
  • 10mL of water
  • 5mL of PVA solution
  • 3 spoonful of corn starch
  • (Optional) Food coloring

The last prototype was the same as the first prototype, but with corn starch. We added corn starch because we knew from previous observations that corn starch thickened the mixture. However prototype 6 was not as firm as we wanted it to be. It did not keep in shape, and was too sticky to use it for our purpose.

Polymer Journal 1: Defining the Problem

Our main goal of the polymer project was to improve shoe wear. After brainstorming for specific ideas, we decided to design a polymer that would support ankles. It would help support existing bruises and restrain users from gaining bruises on the user’s feet, especially on the ankles. We thought that by attaching a piece of polymer on part of shoes, it would be able to increase its comfortableness. Additionally, it would also work in a medical aspect.

There are already different types of ankle supporters available in the market. However, through research, we found out that there were almost none that were fit into shoes. Most were in forms of a bandage or silicone pieces that were only attached to feet. If our polymer was made for shoes, it would be more convenient in wearing and taking off shoes. Furthermore, one of the best advantages our polymer has is its flexibility. It would be able to mold into different shapes of shoes and remain the same way, which is a characteristic that is very hard to find in other products on the market.

Properties that our polymer must have is that it must be soft, and a cushion like texture. It has to be moldable and flexible. However, it has to be sticky enough to stay in place. Other features include heat and cold resistance. The polymer must also meet properties of other products as well, such as texture that does not affect the user’s walking.

Comparing Travel Articles (Iceland vs. Russia)

Travel Article Venn Diagram

Travel Article Venn Diagram

The venn diagram above shows the differences and similarities between two travel articles. Both were written about a visit to a famous volcano, but one was in Iceland and the other was in Russia. This venn diagram compares the imagery, design, allusion, tone, geography and shifts. Main differences include use of maps and the focus of the articles.

Travel Article Analysis

Condé Nast Traveler (December 2013)
Italy, Uncensored

Through this article, Lawrence Osborne shares his experience of visiting Naples, Italy. He describes his meal at Mimiì Alla Ferrovia and writes the conversation between him and his neighbor. The author states that Naples is a miserable place, but it is alive.

“Italy, Uncensored” appeals to experienced travelers who are willing to visit somewhere different.

This article is a narrative with a short summary at the end.

The Heavenly City

The Heavenly City

The Heavenly City, written by Stevie Smith, is a short poem about utopia. This collage of photos represent the visual imagery described by the speaker. The narrator explains the heavenly city they long for in detail. These features, such as “lilies and poppies” and “bright moony beams” were included in the collage. Other images that reminded me of the poem were also incorporated.

Racism vs. I, Too

Racism vs. I, Too

Racism vs. I, Too

Racism by Oodjeroo Noonuccal and I, Too by Langston Huges are both short poems about racism. This venn diagram examines the differences and similarities between these two poems. Differences include tone, theme and punctuation usage. The conflict, perspective and structure are some aspects that both poems share in common.