The Burning Phoenix

“He got himself born all over again. And it looks like we’re doing the same thing, over and over, but we’ve got one damn thing the phoenix never had, we know the damn silly things we just did.” (Bradbury 165) “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury, is unlike any other book. The story of this dystopian society can be good or bad in different point of views. A man named, Guy Montag, is a fireman, who is hired to burn books. Sounds outrageous in our world, but it is an ordinary job in Montag’s society.

In the beginning of the book, Montag is a normal citizen. He has a wife, a job, and a house. His neighbor, Clarisse McClellan and her family, is known to be weird and strange. Towards the end of the book, after Montag realizes that the society is not what he thinks it is like, and after he kills his Captain Beatty for making him burn his own house. “ ‘Something the matter, Montage?’ ‘Why,’ said Montage slowly, ‘we’ve stopped in front of my house.’ ” (113) Montag runs away with a few books. Along the way, he plants some books into some other fireman’s home to tell them that the society is not what they think it is like and to tell them to read the books to find out that what they are doing is wrong. After the society realizes that Montag has gotten away and has murdered Beatty, the society attempts to chase Montag and catch him, but with the help of Faber, Montag goes into the river where the Mechanical Hound can not track his scent. “ You’d better head for the river if you can, follow along it, and if you can hit the old railroad lines going out into the country, follow them.”(134) Montag listens to Faber’s instructions and follows the railroad track that leads him to Granger’s current camp site. When he arrives at the campsite, Granger introduces himself and everyone else in the camp. While they were talking, bombs from the sky started dropping at hitting their city. Granger explains to Montag about all the things they have been doing the past few years after they had escaped the city. Granger gave Montag a very important lesson about their society. “But every time he burnt himself up he sprang out of ashes, he got himself born all over again. And it looks like were doing the same thing, over and over, but we’ve got one damn thing the phoenix never had. We know the damn silly thing we just did.” (165) They learned that books are very important because, without it, we won’t know the past and the history. As the story ends, and the city is gone, Montag and Granger’s team go back to the city and a new society has begun.

The resolution of this story has not ended, enough though the author ended the story; the author ended it when they were going back to fix their society, to make it better. But that’s not the end of it. The end of the story should be after they create a new community and started a new society again. Ray Bradbury, ended the story with a “cliff-hanger”, it lets the reader imagine what happens next. So we can use our imagination and visualize what kind of society will they create. In my opinion, I’m not satisfied with the resolution of this book. I personally think that the book could have a better ending; by finishing it with how they rebuild their town after it was bombed and ruined. All in all, the book was a worth reading book and I learned more about Dystopian Futures.

Would You Dare to Break the Law?

Have you ever wondered when is the right time to break the law?

In the book, “Fahrenheit 451” by Ray Bradbury. The protagonist, Guy Montag, is a fireman. His job is to burn books, instead of putting out fires. “Fahrenheit 451” is in a dystopian setting in which the people living in this society are not happy. Some of the citizens of this society knew they had to make a change, but nobody did anything. Everything changes when Montag takes a chance.

“ ‘ You can’t ever have my books,’ she said. ‘You know the law,’ said Beatty.” (Bradbury 42) During the rising action, Montag’s view of this society changed. After seeing the woman burn with her books, he knew that they must be a reason why the woman would die with her books. “Let’s not quibble over individuals with memoriums. Forget them. Burn all, burn everything.” (63) Once he realized that Beatty was wrong about books and how books were important to our lives, he knew he need to make a change before it was too late. Another well-known novel called, “The Giver”, has a similar conflict with Montag. In “The Giver”, the main character, Jonas, lives in a dystopia society. The citizens see no color and feel no love for each other. Montag and Jonas both knew that the civilization they live in isn’t right and the only way to make a change was to break the law and risk their life.

In Jonas’s society, they believe that everyone should be equal, no color, no love, and no memories of the past. The only people who were allowed to know the memories were The Giver and Receiver-in-training. When Jonas was in training and received many joyful and frightening memories, he learned that the society they live in wasn’t fair. “He felt such love for Asher and for Fiona. But they could not feel it back, without the memories.” (Lowry 135) Jonas wanted everyone to feel love the same way he did for The Giver, his family, and friends. “I’m grateful to you, Jonas, because without you I would never have figured out a way to bring about the change. But your role now is to escape. And my role is to stay.” (162) However, He knew that the only way to make that change was to escape and make the change for the community. Jonas and Montag had the same conflict, trying to save their society, but they had to break the law. They had to make sure it was worth the risk or else they will be dead. Montag had Faber to guild him through his journey the same way The Giver did to Jonas. Faber gave Montag an earpiece so he would know what to say and what to do with Faber’s knowledge. Even though they were planning to break the law and Montag couldn’t tell his wife, Mildred, because it was too dangerous. Jonas had to lie to his family and friends to keep them safe. In the end, both Montag and Jonas decided to break the law and run away. A society that believes in burning books and a community that doesn’t have color or love, needs to be saved. Montag and Jonas live in two diverse stories but have identical conflict with their society.