Tag Archives: Mark Twain

That Troubling Injun Joe

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Make these here

Murder of the Doctor is the talk of the town for a few days. Suspicion sits saliently like toxic fumes resting above Sawyer’s town. In the book The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, by Mark Twain, the rising action and climax bring the heat. Muff Potter and Injun Joe were the only people who were known to be there that night. Nobody thought that Huckleberry and Tom were sitting silently in the shadows. They saw Injun Joe murder the poor Doctor, but everyone put the blame on Muff when they found his knife, the knife that killed the Doctor. Though the accusations were false, he gets sent to prison. At the trial, Tom cannot stand the fact that an innocent man is suffering for the nefarious act performed by Injun Joe. Filled with confidence, he tells the story of what he saw on the night of the murder. While Sawyer speaks, Joe cleverly escapes the courtroom. Tom, fearful and scared, worries that Joe would murder him. Nothing happens for a few days, and Tom soon forgets about all his concerns. A few nights later, Tom and Huck are hunting for treasure, when a disguised Injun Joe catches their eye. Under his arm is a chest of money which the boys are keen to find. The next day, Becky’s parents arrange a picnic for all the young kids in town. When all the kids headed back from exploring the cave near the river, Tom and Becky never made it back. The two kids lost inside the cave soon discover Injun Joe was also inside the same cave. Terror strikes through the two, how would they get back?

In my series of tweets, I was hoping to portray the desperateness in the kids voice. I hoped to portray the sense of two kids lost in a cave then discovering they were with a murderer. It follows the story line of Tom and Becky first getting into the cave, then getting lost. Another tweet describes discovering Injun Joe was hiding out in the cave. After all that trauma, the tweets continue with Tom and Becky tweeting together, praying for the best.

Back to the Good Old Days

Pirate ships and adventures off to islands along the Mississippi River, nobody could take the venture out of Tom and his loyal friends. In the book, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain, a story unfolds about the interesting life of Tom Sawyer. Tom lives with his foster Aunt Polly and a young boy named Sid. Packed with audacious adventures, Tom with his best friend Huckleberry Finn tackle adventures we only dream about. Living in a small town in America, many think it’s boring; however, Tom and Huckleberry don’t live by stereotypes. Through using certain phrases to describe their daily lives, we figure out the tone of the text.

Throughout the text, there was a very patent nostalgic tone. Growing up in the 21st century, lots of the ventures Tom Sawyer went on don’t occur in our daily lives today. But, because the sense of family and reckless fun was a common experience when we were younger. When reading the book, you feel like you’re reading an autobiography of an older man writing about his young self. Though Twain didn’t write this book based on his own childhood. It makes us remember the days when we thought we had met our soul mates at the ripe age of ten in Sunday school: “ ‘You only just tell a boy you won’t have ever have anybody but him, ever ever ever, and then you kiss and that’s all…’” (Twain 49). Remembering the first time we ever had a crush, confessing to them was the hardest part. Often the dialogue between two friends was very casual, the grammatical errors, the slang, the tone. Because of the contrast between the formal narrative text and the carefree dialogue made the whole thing very nostalgic. Another thing Mark Twain did to remind us of our childhood was using lines like “all the ‘rot’ [health magazines] contained about ventilation, and how to go to bed, and how to get up… was all gospel to her…” (75). We all experience a time in our childhood, when magazines become our best friends. Taking every quiz in the whole magazine until we find out if we’re a snicker doodle or a cinnamon bun, paying attention to those health magazines. We all felt at some point needing to listen, and really wanting to live healthier. Sometimes our parents would tell us everything in there was a lie, but kids never listen. He knows what buttons to push with trying to remind us of our childhood. This novel expresses many tones, but the main one would have is the nostalgic tone.

Another tone I found quite often was humor. Mark Twain wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer very satirically. Being only ten years of age, Tom Sawyer was young and immature. Filled with mischief, he envies Huckleberry Finn’s lazy lifestyle and freedom. As the novel progresses, we see Tom Sawyer mature, making better choices. How Twain narrates Sawyer growing up was bursting with humor. I found it all light-hearted especially when he uses phrases with words like “Auntie, I wish I hadn’t done it – but I didn’t think” (Twain 118). When I read this line, all I could think of was all the times I had ever said this exact phrase to my parents. He uses phrases like these sporadically throughout the book, making me chuckle at the immature excuses Tom makes to get out of trouble. Dripping with humor and nostalgia, Twain finds a good balance and writes a great childhood tale of two friends.

Overall, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, showed a great deal of nostalgia and humor. Reading the book with bring you immense joy and longing at the same time. Laughing at the satire used in certain scenes to describe the daft behaviors of immature kids, longing the feeling of foolish fun. Certain phrases are so important to setting the tone of the whole adventure.