Art Fast/Slow Drawing

This art project of drawing a rickshaw drawing was one of the most unique art experiences for me. During this project, I showed a demonstration of the two skills: Gestural and Continuous contour lines. The difference between these two is Gestural is a quick sketch to outline the basics of your art, and Continuous contour line is drawing in lines in which your hand rarely leaves the paper.

The first time I was introduced to this project, I was shocked how amazing it looked when you combined these two types of art. When drawing Continuous contour lines on top of your gestural drawing, it didn’t have to match perfectly, which is what made everyones look so special. When being brought into this project, their are a few things I would have done better the second time around, which would be to not focus too hard on the gestural drawing. If you just let your hand “go with the flow” you will find that at the end your drawing may look weird, but it really creates this sense of those two drawing binding together to create a whole new one.

One thing I found challenging in this project was the contour line drawing. Every time I sketch, I love to draw it in strokes so that it is straight. But with this drawing, it is recommended to draw without your hand leaving the paper. It is something different, but I will admit, drawing with wobbling lines gives it a more realistic taste. And lastly, one thing I learned from this project is how to draw contour lines and really how to bring it to life, and also how to combine these two drawings to create one beautiful masterpiece.

Art Fast/Slow Drawing

This art project of drawing a rickshaw drawing was one of the most unique art experiences for me. During this project, I showed a demonstration of the two skills: Gestural and Continuous contour lines. The difference between these two is Gestural is a quick sketch to outline the basics of your art, and Continuous contour line is drawing in lines in which your hand rarely leaves the paper.

The first time I was introduced to this project, I was shocked how amazing it looked when you combined these two types of art. When drawing Continuous contour lines on top of your gestural drawing, it didn’t have to match perfectly, which is what made everyones look so special. When being brought into this project, their are a few things I would have done better the second time around, which would be to not focus too hard on the gestural drawing. If you just let your hand “go with the flow” you will find that at the end your drawing may look weird, but it really creates this sense of those two drawing binding together to create a whole new one.

One thing I found challenging in this project was the contour line drawing. Every time I sketch, I love to draw it in strokes so that it is straight. But with this drawing, it is recommended to draw without your hand leaving the paper. It is something different, but I will admit, drawing with wobbling lines gives it a more realistic taste. And lastly, one thing I learned from this project is how to draw contour lines and really how to bring it to life, and also how to combine these two drawings to create one beautiful masterpiece.

A Man And The Ocean Glen Zhang

An ocean of people, as far as the eye can see, blocking my view of the beach. A beautiful, dazzling sun preaches over everyone, and everyone is living it. I find an empty space near a couple to the left, and a husband and wife who have two kids that are booming out “wha wha” sounds as they wet the sand in drips of tears. I do a nice flick with my wrist, and my mat snaps our and hovers down. Just then a nice ocean breeze drifted at me, it is a salty and refreshing smell that will never get old.

I set up my umbrella and cannonballed into the sparkling, breezy water. *Splish-splash**splish-splash*, the sounds of me swerving around in the ocean, the sound of water melted, it makes me feel alive, really into it. Wave after wave, seeing every stress that I have in my life in each and every one. *Hhhhhhh* I let out a big breath of relief, I have really seen every struggle in life, work, bills, taxes, it hurts to think about it, but this day off really did me good, and the nice scenery and cooling water washes it all away. having my recovery minutes, I crawl onto the crisp and crunchy sand, and curl into a ball under my umbrella. I closed my eyes, and my mind along with my soul roamed in a world of inner peace.

I open up my cabinet, and pull out the complete refreshing formula, a smooth, cold icy can of sprite. With a simple pull of the thumb, carbon gets released out of the can, is there a more relieving sound than that? I think to myself. My lips connect to the cold can like the north and south side of a magnet, and the lemon, sizzling drift just blows me away.

Setting Capture In “To Build A Fire”

This story is a really setting heavy based story that talks about how this man is in the wild, and it describes deeply on the thoughts, setting, and movement that the man is going through.

One of the main settings that the author has established is the temperature of this place. It must be a really cold climate, because the author states many times how freezing it is. For example, in pace 60 on the third paragraph, he states many times how many degrees it was outside, and he also has the thought of heat and frost being a mans weakness. Another example is on page 62. It says: “The frozen moistness of it’s breathing had settled on it’s fur in a fine powder of frost. The hair on the man’s face was similarly frosted, but more solidly.

Another setting the author has established is how dangerous the environment is. On page 63, he said: “During the next two hours he came to several similar dangers.” and later on it says how he has fallen through the ice.