For this multimedia post, I decided to compare and contrast page 72 of a graphic novel called Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, and page 37 of the informational article called Iran Through the Looking Glass.

Although they are both talking about the American Hostage Crisis, Persepolis is much more biased, and in a very angry and abhorring tone, while the informational article is more objective. The two pieces both have simple sentences, but because Persepolis is a graphic novel, it cannot have sentences that are too long, while Iran Through the Looking Glass has longer sentences with sentence structures of both simple and compound. The word choice of Persepolis is quite casual, and it includes some swears and prejudiced language. Iran Through the Looking Glass has a neutral diction — it does not include any really difficult vocabulary, but still is written in a way so that we will understand clearly what they’re trying to say.

It was interesting to see a part of the Iranian Revolution in two different ways: one that is biased opinionated, and another that plainly states the facts. After comparing Persepolis and Through the Looking Glass, I not only understand more about the American Hostage Crisis (and the revolution), but I also understand more about why historians would want to analyze multiple sources about one topic.

Sources: www.canva.com