Places Where I Don’t Belong

Imagine living in two places where you don’t fit in. In both places, you were the “odd” one. Your culture never matches the place, and your lifestyles are different. In the book Brown Girl Dreaming, the author, Jacqueline Woodson, describes her childhood in the 60s and 70s, especially when her brown skin color matters a lot during that period of time. Raised in North and South, Jacqueline feels she’s halfway home in both places. In the award-winning book Brown Girl Dreaming, the author, Jacqueline Woodson describes her two homes in a way so descriptive that we can imagine ourselves there. In Brooklyn, she was left out in events because of her religion, and in the South, she was teased of her Northern culture.

 

As a Jehovah’s Witness Jacqueline was confined to many activities and couldn’t find friends with the common language in Brooklyn. In this religion, Jacqueline was restricted from several things to do. “Because we’re witnesses, no Halloween, no Christmas, no birthdays.” (Woodson, 164) The environment that she was in was very different in comparison to the country-side life back in the South. Brooklyn was not a carefree place. With all the bustling streets and busy crowds, Jacqueline experiences an urban life there. “The rain here is different than the way it rains in Greenville. No sweet smell of honeysuckle. No soft squish of pine. No slip and slide through grass.” (165) While at school, teachers put high expectations and pressure on Jacqueline. They thought that her academics were as good as her sister, Odella’s, but Jacqueline had proved them wrong, she disappointed the adults and was forgotten soon. “Everyone knows my sister is brilliant…she is gifted we are told. And I imagine presents surrounding her. I am not gifted. When I read, the words twist twirl across the page. When they settle, it is too late. The class has already moved on.” (169) Jacqueline was trying hard, but her talent was not discovered, and she was discouraged. However, with her neighbor and best friend, Maria, she gained support. And when Jacqueline’s mother crushed her dreams of becoming a writer, she only continued writing and kept practicing with persistence. She finally wrote her first book in Brooklyn, named Butterfly. “And somehow, one day, it’s just there speckled black and white, the paper inside smelling like something I could fall right into live there-inside those clean white pages.” (164)

 

In the South where Jacqueline’s grandparents are, she and her siblings sometimes are left out by the other kids because of their way of living in the North. Children in their neighborhood would refuse to play with them, and students and teachers at school wouldn’t accept them. In the leisurely lifestyle and the relaxing activities, Jacqueline rather enjoys her time with her grandparents, with her grandfather playing the role of her ‘PaPa’. With her rural environment, everything seems closer to nature. “Warm autumn night with the crickets crying the smell of pine coming soft on the wind and the women on the porch, quilts across their laps, Aunt Lucinda, Miss Bell and whatever neighbor…”(Woodson, 98) But with her mother’s demanding rules, Jacqueline often could only watch other kids play outside. And with her Northern accent, Jacqueline was mocked by others. “While our friends are watching TV or playing outside, we are in our house, knowing that begging our mother to turn the television on is useless, begging her for ten minutes outside will only mean her saying no.” (167)

 

This book was relatable to a friend of mine. Her father was from New Zealand, and her mother was a Chinese. The mixture of Western and Asian culture made it uneasy for her. In both places, she was a minority in both places. Technically, she didn’t look alike nor acted alike to the majority of the people in neither of the country she’s from. She couldn’t blend into the society, but she always worked hard towards the problem. I saw how she adapted herself into the Chinese society through advancing her Chinese language speaking, improving skills of using chopsticks. She told me that she was from both New Zealand and China, but she seems to be coming from neither at the same time.

 

Jacqueline’s story illustrates her two major places where she grew up, and neither does she fit in well in the society. As her journey continues, she adapts and thrives in her societies with her writing talent. She also discovered her writing talent within. Brown Girl Dreaming has places with dreams and memories, and they are unforgettable for the writer, and unforgettable by the reader.

 

The places where Jacqueline doesn’t belong to, are the places where her dreams come from and become true.

Once upon a time, there was a small village

“One hill, one valley. One day at a time” (Park, back cover).

Winner of John Newbery Medal, the setting of A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park illustrates a wonderful picture of Tree-ears village, Ch’ulp’o and takes us on a time-traveling adventure to a village in Korea in the middle ages. Set in a small village on the west coast of Korea during the late 12th century, everyone greeted each other with warmth. “The well-fed of the village greeted each other politely…” (Park, 3). The famous potters in the small village live in tranquility with each other, helping and taking turns to cut wood for the kiln. The village is full of resources, with edible wild mushrooms and vegetables for the poor to consume as well. As a poor, the main character in the story, Tree-ear was adopted by his friend, Crane-man, and they have been sleeping, eating, living together under the space under the bridge ever since they met. Although small and damp, the space has been a warming home for the two. “Tree-ear shared the space under the bridge with Crane-man” (Park, 7). Before the Royal emissary arrived the village, life has been simple and unpretentious for all villagers. Then, until one day when the competition arrived, Tree-ear requested himself to help Min send a pot in the capital of Korea, Songdo, he must overcome different challenges during his journey, especially in the city, Puyo, that he will have to pass by. Robbers, dangerous animals are both threats to Tree-ear. The places in A Single Shard helped the story develop in a unique way. On my book cover shows a Korean village in the 12th century, with beautiful sceneries and simple houses. Mist surrounds the place at the crack of dawn, hills and mountains far away in the background and gives us a clearer scenery of where the story takes place.