Are you a decision maker?

Do you think caring about small problems rather than the big problems are useless? Actually, caring about small problems can be very important because that small problem might cause a bigger problem. In “A Sound of Thunder” by Ray Bradbury, small problems can cause bigger problems to happen.

Before time traveling to the past, Travis keeps on telling Eckels, the protagonist, to not go off the path. Before Eckels time traveled to the past, Travis keeps on repeating the sentence: “Stay on the path. Don’t go off it. I repeat. Don’t go off” (Bradbury 225). Throughout the story, Travis keeps on warning Eckels to stay on the path, and it shows how it is so dangerous to just step out of the path, or else the whole history might change. As Travis explains to Eckels later on, just stepping one little thing such as stepping on a mouse can change the whole future.

This theme could also be seen when Eckels went out of the path and accidentally killed one butterfly. Eckels not listening to Travis’s warning caused Eckels to kill a butterfly, which then the future changes. When Eckels killed a golden butterfly on accident, he said, “No, it can’t be. Not a little thing like that. No!” (236). This quote shows how Eckels noticed he had done something really wrong that affected a lot of things, and how he had to follow what Travis had said. Before he killed a butterfly, he thought just killing one small thing wasn’t a big deal, but after he had actually done it, he noticed how small things were so important, and he can’t take it back. In “A Sound of Thunder”, the author shows that caring about small things might be very important because there’s a chance that those small things can affect big things to happen throughout the story.

 

 Picture Citation: “Moving-on-Quotes-Better-Be-Careful.jpg.” Quotes Boxes | You Number One Source for Daily Inspirational Quotes, Saynings & Famous Quotes, quotesboxes.com/motivational/moving-on/moving-on-quotes-better-be-careful/attachment/moving-on-quotes-better-be-careful-jpg/.

 

 

 

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I’m 100% human but 90% humanist

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Louder, Prouder


Have you ever been ashamed of who you are just because of where you were born? In the short story “Fish and Cheeks”, written by Amy Tan, the protagonist is ashamed of her culture, but her parents want her to be prouder of who she is.

During Christmas Eve when the protagonist, Amy had a crush on a American boy and came to her house to eat dinner together, Amy was embarrassed about her culture. When Amy’s mom brings out the fish for dinner, her dad gives out a fish cheek to her, Amy claims, “I wanted to disappear” (Tan 1). She was ashamed of what her parents prepared for dinner, for example the fish, which American’s don’t really eat for dinner for celebrities. She was also ashamed of how her parents and relatives were acting because they were acting like “Chinese”, like when her dad belched to thank her mom for her fine cooking, which is a polite Chinese custom. Although Amy was so embarrassed, her parents expected her to be proud of who she really is. After everyone had left after the dinner, Amy’s mom knew that Amy wants be the same as American girls. Amy’s mom expected her to always be Chinese inside: “’Your only shame is to have shame’” (2). Even though Amy’s mom understood that Amy wants to dress up like American girls on the outside, she wanted to her to stay like a Chinese girl inside, and be proud of her culture because that is who she’s supposed to be. In the end Amy was able to fully appreciate her mom’s lesson and know that we don’t have to be so scared to show who we are and what we do.

 

Picture Citation: “Top 100 Love Yourself: Self-Esteem, Self-Worth and Self-Love Quotes.” Quote Ambition, 1 May 2017, www.quoteambition.com/love-yourself-self-esteem-self-worth-self-love-quotes/.

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Love or bassion?

The found poem above was taken from page four of the short story “The Bass, the River, and Sheila Mant” by W.D. Wetherell. It shows the conflict of man versus self, which is when the narrator, the protagonist, had to make a decision. This conflict occurred during the climax, when the narrator cut the line in half, when he had to choose between the biggest bass he has ever got, and Sheila Mant which he had a crush on. In this passage it forced the narrator to make a decision. The narrator had to choose if he would keep the fish, or he would choose Sheila Mant so he can get her attention to him. If the bass was a “normal” bass, it would’ve been easier to make a decision for him, but since he got the biggest bass he had ever seen, the narrator had a hard time making a decision.    In the end, the narrator learnt from his mistake that he needs to choose what he really wants, or else he would lose something really important.

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ONEday Project 2017-cooking a meal

thumbnail_image-copy-2 thumbnail_image-copy-5 thumbnail_image-copythumbnail_image-copy-3 thumbnail_image-1 thumbnail_image-copy-9 thumbnail_image-copy-8Our goal (Hina and Kate 6-5) was to improve on our cooking skills by making a meal to eat so that would help us with our future. We first made a honey garlic chicken by cooking chicken breasts with the sauce on (Sauce is made out of soy sauce, honey, garlic and ginger). Then we made mashed potatoes with salt and butter mixed in. Ten we made the gravy to put it on either the chicken breasts or the mashed potatoes. But the gravy came up to be yellowish because we used the white flour instead of brown flour. Our succeed were that we learned something new in our project, and people liked our meal. Our challenge was that since my partner (Kate) had to leave school early, so we had to finish the cooking quick for her to taste our meal. We will continue keeping up these skills we learned, and use it for our future when we have to make food by ourselves.

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