Hour of Code 2018

Hour of Code is an annual event for schools organised by Code.org, a group that seeks to promote coding around the world, particularly supporting women and minorities. Typically, Hour of Code takes place in the first week of December, but the 200+ activities are available to explore anytime. It could be a good opportunity for you to increase the amount of coding you include in your teaching, or just to have options for fun end-of-year activities.

If you are interested in exploring Hour of Code with your students, we recommend you:

  • Have a group discussion about which students are interested in coding and what they may know already – perhaps skilled students could lead novice students
  • Take a look over the HoC activities library and offer students some choice about what/how they wish to learn
  • Consider incorporating robotics such as Edison (UES), MangoBot (LES) and Lego Mindstorms (UES-HS) either in-class or in the design lab(s)
  • Talk to anyone in Ed Tech for more specific ideas linked to your units

Outside of the Code.org library, there are other ways to explore coding with your students, including:

Happy coding and let us know if you would like any help or suggestions!

Sam

Parent Access to DX

Currently, parents can access Dragons’ Exchange (DX) to see the deadlines that have been set for their children and to see how

In order to access Dragons’ Exchange, use the quick link at the top of the ISB web page/Dragons’ Gate or go to http://dx.isb.bj.edu.cn.

Click the login button:

When logging in, use the same email address that you use for Dragons’ Gate: first.last@isb.bj.edu.cn:

and use the same password:

Once logged in, you can select the calendar function to see overdue and upcoming assignments and tasks for each student in DX:

Please note that parents do not have access to classrooms or classroom resources. At this point, access has only been given to the calendar function.

iMovie for iOS

iMovie for iOS is a super powerful app, although it does differ from iMovie on the MacBook. The following video is a good place to start if you’ve never used iMovie for iPad. It’s only 9 minutes and well worth a look! You may need to rewatch certain sections of the video, so I have included times so you can easily skip to the section you’re looking for.

This introduction video shows you how to:

  • import footage from the media library (1:38) and delete what is not needed (1:50)
  • split clips or reorder them in the timeline (2:30)
  • screen jestures (3:10)
  • add music (3:30)
  • picture-in-picture (4:15)
  • add titles and transitions (5:33)
  • colour-correction and filters (add to individual clip or entire video) (6:07)
  • Adjust volume levels (7:13)
  • Add in fades for clips and/or audio (8:15)
  • Export (8:58)

If you’ve already use iMovie on the iPad, this second video might be more useful for you. Learn how to master iMovie for iOS with these top 15 mobile editing tips and tricks.

The tips highlighted include:

  • Use quick-snap feature to quickly see the start or end of your video
  • Split clips
  • Add and delete freeze frames
  • Apply filters to your clips (video or images)
  • Rotate clips in the viewer
  • Apply audio fades
  • Crop or re-frame clips
  • Use theme transitions
  • Keyboard shortcuts *applicable for those with Bluetooth keyboards

 

Getting Grammarly Set Up

All high school students and teachers are automatically signed up for Grammarly. In order to activate your Premium account, you will have to do one of the following:

Verify Your Account Using the Email Sent to Your Address

Most users should receive an email to verify their account. Simply click the “Activate My Account” Link and you are ready to go!

 

Signing Up on the Website

If, for some reason, you do not have the activation email, you can sign up using your ISB student email address at http://www.grammarly.com/edu.

Once there, click “Join Your Organization”:

Fill in the correct information, including your ISB email address:

You will receive a confirmation email:

 

Once you click “Verify email” you should be all set. Sometimes, however, it will ask you to put in your school code. If it does, you can copy/paste this code:

TGP2tfw6JsUe58QF

You may also want to add the Grammarly browser extension so that it can be used in easily across all of your web applications:

 

 

 

Blogging!

All images are free for use from Canva

A few simple rules for blogging:

  1. Don’t post your last name
  2. Cite everything that is not yours!
  3. Categorize your posts
  4. Embed your media & create “clean” links
  5. Use this rubric to write engaging MASTERY blogposts

 

How can you IMPROVE your blog:

  • Make sure you have categories for:
    • Humanities
    • Science
    • Math
    • Integrated
    • Design
    • Arts
    • Enrichments
    • Activities
    • Languages
    • Global-mindedness
    • Integrity
    • Respect
    • Balance
    • Service
    • Myself as a Learner (this is a category you use for posts to support your SLC)
  • Make sure your banner is personalized
  • Add a widget?

All done?  Have you blogged about a cool activity you’ve done or an athletics accomplishment?

Read other blogs… give them good feedback on their blogs!

 

 

 

Strip Designer – Comic Strip Creation

Strip Designer is now available on our iPads! It’s a great app that allows students to create their own personal comic strip using photos from the photo album on the iPad or hand-drawn sketches. You can add simple image filters, speech bubbles, stickers and effect text like this – OMG!

While you edit your comic you can freely zoom and pan to manipulate even small details. When you are done, save the resulting image to the iPhone’s photo album, email it or share via Twitter or on the student blogs! Another cool alternive could be to use Book Creator an export to iBooks as full blown eBook for sharing.

There are loads of benefits to having students create comic strips in your classroom. Plasq Education describes the following as reasons to incorporate comic strip creation into your classroom:

  • They are a great visual representation of knowledge
  • Presents what is essential
  • Easier to remember a visual graphic containing key information
  • Engaging through thinking, creating and writing.
  • A perfect avenue for writing dialogue
  • Incites students with a low interest in writing
  • Helps organisation through storytelling and storyboarding
  • Using visual images convey meaning to a story or topic
  • Develops creative and higher level thought processes
  • Develops composition techniques through visual-verbal connections
  • Enriches reading, writing, and thinking
  • Serves as an assessment and evaluation tool
  • Sequencing promotes understanding

How do I use Strip Creator?

This app is simple to use but it also has the ability to use some more complex features. The following series of videos outline these features. Begin with the introduction and from there it’s easy to get started! If you’re keen to know more about a specific feature,  including image options, stickers and effects and cells, continue to view that video accordingly.

Introduction

Image Options

Stickers & Effects

Cell Adjustment

Now go, have fun and make comics! Be sure to share student exemplars with the Ed Tech team (and with the world via Twitter #learnISB) so that we can publish them here to share with others. Any support you might need, don’t hesitate to ask.

Enjoy!

Made by Laura in approximately 60 seconds!

 

 

Bookmarks for the New Year

Here are a lot of common sites that you will need for your everyday teaching/learning at ISB:

Dragon’s Exchange (DX) – Learning Management System for Secondary Students and Teachers

Dragons’ Tube .  Internal video curation system for teachers and students

Blogs – student blogs

Ed Tech Blog – The blog created by the EdTech team for resources

Powerschool – Attendance, Grading

Dragons’ Gate – Login section of the School website

Vidigami .  – Internal photo curation system

ES Parent Workshop: Getting Ready For Summer

On Tuesday morning, Ed Tech hosted another parent workshop in our Family Tech Agreements series. This time we looked at the unique challenges and opportunities of media and technology use by our students during the Summer holidays.

We began by revisiting aspects of the previous parent workshop, such as how to work with your children to create a Family Media Agreement, and ISB’s Media Mentor Month.

Family Media Agreement

Family Media Agreements have become a favourite model for parents looking to develop a media mentor model at home. Having open discussion around technology use as a family allows each member a chance to reflect on their own habits and what they hope to see from one another. Workshop attendees were invited to use the ISB Family Tech Agreements worksheets, or, create their own, in ways that best suited their particular circumstances as a family.

How may your family media agreement need to change to suit the different context of Summer Break?

Activities & Projects

Next, we explored some different media/technology tools that may be of interest to your child that focus on creation over consumption. In most cases, the media and technology is actually a conduit for a hands-on activity.

DIY.org (“Do it Yourself”)

DIY is a safe online community for kids to discover new passions, level up their skills, and meet likeminded people. There are thousands of activities and projects available, and users can unlock many different “patches” (badges) as a reward for their efforts.

Instructables

Instructables is similar to DIY and the premise is that users are encouraged to develop instructional resources for the online community. Users can explore many different projects, from technology and electronics, to woodworking, cooking, gardening and sports. As many instructables projects are a bit more advanced than DIY, it can be a great way for parents to work with their children. The email newsletter includes wide-ranging projects as well as regular challenges and competitions.

TED-Ed

TED-Ed is the educational spin-off of TED (Technology, Education & Design). There are thousands of short videos on all sorts of topics, created by lots of different people. A particular highlight are the different problem solving riddles which can be a great way to get families having fun together.

Slides

Summary

Each family is different and as such needs to shape media and technology use in ways that suit them. We strongly recommend developing a media agreement, as well as exploring constructive and creative tools such as those shown above. We wish you a safe and relaxing Summer Break and please be in touch if you ever need any support or advice.

How to Upload a Video on Dragon’s Tube

First – record awesome media!

Please include everyone’s name on the video but DO NOT USE last names in your video.

Please cite any outside media you have used.

Second – login to Dragon Tube

Third – Complete the following required information:

 

Fourth – scroll to the bottom to click “Submit” (make sure you see this message):

Wait a few minutes while your video uploads and converts

Watch other classmates’ videos if you are done early!

“Parents as Media Mentors” workshop

On Tuesday, March 20, ES parents were invited to the workshop “Parents as Media Mentors: Tech and the 21st Century Family”, hosted by Clint Hamada, Rebecca Taylor and Sam Griffin (ES Ed Tech) and ES Counsellor, Kevin Kooienga.

The workshop offered parents an opportunity to explore:

The session began with a clip from an American experiment where children were allowed unconstrained access to technology over a period of a few days. From this, it wasn’t hard to see the importance of setting boundaries as the children clearly became tired and agitated. Interestingly, the children themselves acknowledged that unlimited technology was unhealthy.

Parenting Styles

In a previous post, Clint outlined Alexandra Samuel’s three styles of parenting when it comes to access to technology at home:

  • The Digital Limiter: prefers to keep their children away from the internet, and often strictly limit screentime. These children are often Digital Exiles, kept out of the digital world for as long as possible;
  • The Digital Enabler: respect their children’s’ abilities to make their own choices online and take cues from other families on how to use technology. These children are often Digital Orphans, left to explore on their own;
  • The Digital Mentor: enjoys spending time with their children online, cultivating their children’s skills and fostering online learning. These children are often Digital Heirs, inheriting their parents’ values and skills.
Quality vs Quantity

Working in table groups, parents in the workshop discussed the different ways technology is being used at home. For example, are we mainly using technology to consume media (such as watching YouTube clips or playing games for entertainment)?  To what extent do our children use technology to create (for example, making games using Scratch or Minecraft)? Or are we using technology to connect with others (social media, Skype etc). In many cases, our children are often doing several of these things in combination (such as watching a YouTube clip of a Minecraft tutorial while simultaneously creating their own Minecraft world). All of this highlights the need for monitoring, discussion and awareness of the quality and quantity of technology use at home.

The ISB RUA

In the ISB Elementary School, our Responsible Use Agreement has been designed to reference the school rules of Be Safe, Be Respectful and Be Responsible in the context of classroom technology. Students, teachers and specialists work with Ed Tech to ensure positive use of technology, supported with a range of proactive (and, where necessary, reactive) measures.

Family Media Agreement

Family Media Agreements have become a favourite model for parents looking to develop a media mentor model at home. Having open discussion around technology use as a family allows each member a chance to reflect on their own habits and what they hope to see from one another. Workshop attendees were invited to use the ISB Family Tech Agreements worksheets, or, create their own, in ways that best suited their particular circumstances as a family.

Workshop Slides

Looking Ahead

Please look out for future parent workshops in this series over the coming months. We are keenly interested in hearing your views on the types of workshops and resources you would like to see in the future – or anything else we can help with – so please be in touch any time.

 

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