Category: Tutorials (page 1 of 4)

iMovie for iOS

iMovie for iOS is a super powerful app, although it does differ from iMovie on the MacBook. The following video is a good place to start if you’ve never used iMovie for iPad. It’s only 9 minutes and well worth a look! You may need to rewatch certain sections of the video, so I have included times so you can easily skip to the section you’re looking for.

This introduction video shows you how to:

  • import footage from the media library (1:38) and delete what is not needed (1:50)
  • split clips or reorder them in the timeline (2:30)
  • screen jestures (3:10)
  • add music (3:30)
  • picture-in-picture (4:15)
  • add titles and transitions (5:33)
  • colour-correction and filters (add to individual clip or entire video) (6:07)
  • Adjust volume levels (7:13)
  • Add in fades for clips and/or audio (8:15)
  • Export (8:58)

If you’ve already use iMovie on the iPad, this second video might be more useful for you. Learn how to master iMovie for iOS with these top 15 mobile editing tips and tricks.

The tips highlighted include:

  • Use quick-snap feature to quickly see the start or end of your video
  • Split clips
  • Add and delete freeze frames
  • Apply filters to your clips (video or images)
  • Rotate clips in the viewer
  • Apply audio fades
  • Crop or re-frame clips
  • Use theme transitions
  • Keyboard shortcuts *applicable for those with Bluetooth keyboards

 

Getting Grammarly Set Up

All high school students and teachers are automatically signed up for Grammarly. In order to activate your Premium account, you will have to do one of the following:

Verify Your Account Using the Email Sent to Your Address

Most users should receive an email to verify their account. Simply click the “Activate My Account” Link and you are ready to go!

 

Signing Up on the Website

If, for some reason, you do not have the activation email, you can sign up using your ISB student email address at http://www.grammarly.com/edu.

Once there, click “Join Your Organization”:

Fill in the correct information, including your ISB email address:

You will receive a confirmation email:

 

Once you click “Verify email” you should be all set. Sometimes, however, it will ask you to put in your school code. If it does, you can copy/paste this code:

TGP2tfw6JsUe58QF

You may also want to add the Grammarly browser extension so that it can be used in easily across all of your web applications:

 

 

 

Strip Designer – Comic Strip Creation

Strip Designer is now available on our iPads! It’s a great app that allows students to create their own personal comic strip using photos from the photo album on the iPad or hand-drawn sketches. You can add simple image filters, speech bubbles, stickers and effect text like this – OMG!

While you edit your comic you can freely zoom and pan to manipulate even small details. When you are done, save the resulting image to the iPhone’s photo album, email it or share via Twitter or on the student blogs! Another cool alternive could be to use Book Creator an export to iBooks as full blown eBook for sharing.

There are loads of benefits to having students create comic strips in your classroom. Plasq Education describes the following as reasons to incorporate comic strip creation into your classroom:

  • They are a great visual representation of knowledge
  • Presents what is essential
  • Easier to remember a visual graphic containing key information
  • Engaging through thinking, creating and writing.
  • A perfect avenue for writing dialogue
  • Incites students with a low interest in writing
  • Helps organisation through storytelling and storyboarding
  • Using visual images convey meaning to a story or topic
  • Develops creative and higher level thought processes
  • Develops composition techniques through visual-verbal connections
  • Enriches reading, writing, and thinking
  • Serves as an assessment and evaluation tool
  • Sequencing promotes understanding

How do I use Strip Creator?

This app is simple to use but it also has the ability to use some more complex features. The following series of videos outline these features. Begin with the introduction and from there it’s easy to get started! If you’re keen to know more about a specific feature,  including image options, stickers and effects and cells, continue to view that video accordingly.

Introduction

Image Options

Stickers & Effects

Cell Adjustment

Now go, have fun and make comics! Be sure to share student exemplars with the Ed Tech team (and with the world via Twitter #learnISB) so that we can publish them here to share with others. Any support you might need, don’t hesitate to ask.

Enjoy!

Made by Laura in approximately 60 seconds!

 

 

How to Upload a Video on Dragon’s Tube

First – record awesome media!

Please include everyone’s name on the video but DO NOT USE last names in your video.

Please cite any outside media you have used.

Second – login to Dragon Tube

Third – Complete the following required information:

 

Fourth – scroll to the bottom to click “Submit” (make sure you see this message):

Wait a few minutes while your video uploads and converts

Watch other classmates’ videos if you are done early!

VideoScribe – The Whiteboard Animation Tool!

VideoScribe is a super great app for creating whiteboard animations. The application allows you to create fun, energetic and animated presentations without the fuss of having to draw on your own. The final product makes it look like you are drawing the illustrations and text – it’s impressive! Every time I’ve created and presented a VideoScribe video, I’m asked “Is that your hand?” – the answer, no! In addition to the simple and effective means to creating an engaging, scribed presentation, the app allows you the option to zoom out, at the completion of the video, and provide the audience with an overview of the story having just been told. This is an added bonus as presentations can essentially double as both video and print based media. This adds an additional challenge for students – What will my presentation look like in print? Will it tell my story without the need for audio or the structured flow of a video?

Here is a short video, created using VideoScribe, that outlines the many benefits of using video as a powerful tool for communication, in particular, the effectiveness of whiteboard style multimedia.

Recently, I have been working with a High School EAL class on a digital storytelling unit. One of the three tasks within this unit, was to develop a persuasive piece, using VideoScribe, on a current political issue, from an English speaking country. The planning process was significant in that, not only did students need to storyboard their persuasive argument, they also needed to consider how they would use the app to effectively convey their message. This included:

  • the selection of appropriate images and key words
  • the right balance of images vs. text
  • a clear and concise script for the voice over
  • selection of an audio track that would assist in conveying the message
  • the visual layout of the information (text and images) at the completion of the video (zoomed out view)

Wumian from Grade 9, choose to research and present his persuasive piece on the current debate in Australia: Should the date of Australia Day be changed?  This is his presentation:

This is another example of VideoScribe being used in the classroom. This time, a Grade 8 student explains the Syrian Revolution. Emily (Grade 8) says “The bloody Syrian Revolution is still going on and people to this day are dying. We think that not a lot people know about this subject, which is why we made this video.”

VideoScribe is now available on the iPads in the Middle and High School and will soon be available on the ES iPads. If you’re keen to offer this app as an alternative option for video creation, or perhaps use this app to create your own flipped learning content, let me know you need any assistance. The VideoScribe website offers a series of tutorials to help get you started. These include adding text and images, change draw and pause times, adding audio and soundtrack files, and publishing and sharing your scribe. I encourage you to give it a go!

How to Embed Video on your ISB Blog

First – record awesome media!

Second – login to Dragon Tube

Third – Complete the following required information:

 

Fourth – scroll to the bottom to click “Submit” (make sure you see this message):

Wait a few minutes while your video uploads and converts

Fifth – Find and copy the embed code for your video

Sixth – go into your blog post, switch to “text” mode and paste the html to embed.  You will not be able to see the embedded video until you publish your post.

It should look like this:

 

Reinvigorate Your Classroom with these 3 iPad apps!

On Wednesday (Jan 17th, 2018) I lead a TTT (Teachers Teaching Teachers) for staff, from PreK-12, on iPad Tools for Creative Teaching and Learning. The purpose of the TTT was to introduce teachers to three apps that are now available on our (brand new!) iPad Pro 2 class set in the library. The apps will soon be available for Elementary classes which is why teachers from across the school were invited to attend (and are encouraged to continue reading if you happen to be an Elementary teacher!)

The apps covered in Wednesday’s TTT were Explain Everything, Stick Around and Apple Clips.

Explain Everything

Explain Everything is an awesome tool for creating instructional and explanatory videos using visuals, annotations and narration. I’ve used this app in the past for blended or flipped learning, providing feedback to students and most often, for students to showcase their understanding and share with their peers. I’m currently working with Monique Cover and her EAL class for a digital storytelling unit. Then first project, in a series of three, has students developing an instructional, informative style tutorial using, you guessed it, Explain Everything. Students are required to develop a tutorial on a topic covered in either Science or Social Studies from last semester. Students will seek feedback from their teachers and make improvements before the final export. The idea is, students will “present” their completed tutorial to their teacher for use in future years. I’m also hoping that they will see what these students have been able to create and ask the question: “How do I do this with all of my students?”

Here is an example of an Explain Everything video created by on of my Grade 7 Science students from Caulfield Grammar School: Scout Squire.

Stick Around

The second app we looked at was Stick Around. Stick Around allows users to create puzzles using drawing tools and/or photos and add stickers with text, images, sound, arrows and/or drawing. Teachers could create puzzles for students (great for formative and timely feedback) or alternatively, students can create puzzles to communicate their understanding and share with their peers. Ideally, if students were creating the puzzle, you’d have a range of topics, so that on completion, all students can benefit from the creations. I’ve managed to set up a folder on the server which will store all Stick Arounds created. This allows them to be downloaded, once published and shared by the creator, by anyone with the Stick Around app. The only downside that I’ve picked up on, is that the puzzles can only be viewed (and played) through the Stick Around app. The files can be shared without a problem, but opening the puzzle is limited. The following video is an example of what a puzzle looks like to play.

The creation of the puzzle itself is surprisingly easy. I was pleased that two Kindergarten teachers that attended my TTT, Sally and Elizabeth, both expressed possible applications for their classrooms. They were also confident that their students, with minimal assistance, would be able to manage the intricacies of the app. This app is not only a great tool for labelling diagrams like in the planet example above, it’s also great for having students complete Venn diagrams, quadrants, tables etc. There are a number of templates that are built into the app which make creation of puzzles even more straightforward forward and accessible. The general steps involved in the creation are:

  • Design a background or select a template to use
  • Create the stickers – these can consists of images, video, weblink and even audio which is great for the littlies.
  • Set the answer scheme.
  • Publish and share the puzzle!

There are some fantastic resources out there to support this product. This is a thorough user guide and see this URL for a range of really great tutorial videos. I love this app!

Apple Clips

The third app we looked at was the new Apple Clips . This is a quick and easy way to create and share fun videos with text, effects, images, stickers and more. There are so many ways that a tool like this could be used in the classroom: explaining a topic, givingformative feedback, examination and explanation of photos or diagrams, explaining the steps in a process, public service announcement or commercial, to name a few. Check out this awesome site that showcases 5 ways to use this app in the classroom and is well worth a look. Essentially, a video comprises of clips and each clip can be edited differently. For example, on clip might include a voice to text option. Another, might use a photo or video from the photo library. To work Clips you must press and hold the red record button. You can also hold the record button and swipe left to lock the record.  A lock symbol will appear.  This is useful for complicated or longer shots. From there you can add:

  •  Live titles – to create these, a voice to text option is available of which I’m impressed with it’s accuracy.
  • Add filters like comic book or ink, stickers and emoji
  • Add overlays – this could be useful for labelling or drawing attention to a particular element
  • Export your video and save to your photo stream

Here is an example of a short movie I made using Apple Clips.

As you can see, Explain Everything, Stick Around and Apple Clips are some pretty awesome ways to create and share authentic learning.  Although you may not feel completely comfortable in using an iPad in your classroom,  Ed Tech is here to provide you the necessary support to take up learning opportunities, like these, for your students. Please send me an email if you’d like to chat further, or even better, if you’re keen to start using one of these apps.

Laura

Categories vs Tags

It’s important to organise the information we share through our blogs to allow users to effectively access previous posts. Two ways to do this are through categories and tags – but what are they? How are categories and tags different and why should we use them? In the following video, Bec shares the different ways categories and tags make it easier to organise your blog’s content.

Scheduling a meeting in Outlook

In last Monday’s TLT, Bec and Clint showed us how to use Scheduling Assistant in Outlook to book a meeting. It is still a bit tricky when making a time with teachers, as class times do not currently feature in calendars, however, this is our recommended method for making a time to meet with specialists… such as Bec and I!

Sam

How to update Seesaw class settings

The ES are doing great things in Seesaw, including lots of student, teacher and parent activity. There are a range of different settings you can explore to find ways to customise the Seesaw experience to your class or grade level. In the following video, I’ll show you how to:

  • Add specialist and co-teachers to class journals
  • Edit students’ preferred names & icons
  • Add parents & allow parent access
  • Add/edit folders & skills
  • Allow student comments & “likes”

We will continue to add Seesaw resources to the Ed Tech blog. In the meantime, please let Bec and myself know anytime you have a question or celebration around Seesaw or if there is another resource you think would benefit the school.

Sam

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