Are Changes Good or Bad?

          Have you ever had a time when you loved a book, a movie version was finally made, but many parts were changed? Well, I am facing that situation right now with The Hobbit, written by J.R.R. Tolkien. As I was reading the resolution, I thought about the differences of the movie version and this original version. The movie version split into three films – An Unexpected Journey, The Desolation of Smaug, The Battle of the Five Armies – was directed by Peter Jackson, distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures. The obvious question is: did the movie stay faithful to the original book? It is hard to say because the technology was highly advanced and the visual effects were excellent (not to mention the beautiful filming locations in New Zealand), as the original book was extremely detailed and descriptive descriptive.

          In my opinion, both of the versions were kind of too complicated for me (I am not that into complicated stories) but the director over-complicated the story even more. There were already so many characters to remember and keep track of but the director added more, who are Legolas and Tauriel (both are elves). The love triangle between them and Kili (a dwarf) was created to attract the audience. In the book, Kili and Fili’s death is mentioned but how they died is not described, as the author writes: “Fili and Kili had fallen defending him with shield and body…” (Tolkien 265). Though in the movie, Kili dies saving the invented character, Tauriel, and this scene brings the audience to tears. The resolution of this book is basically the war ending and Bilbo, the protagonist, returning home safe and sound. The battle scenes are all excluded in the book because he is unconscious at that time and the book is written in the third person, but mostly from Bilbo’s point of view, the author writes: “… but at that moment a stone hurtling from above smote heavily on his helm, and he fell with a crash and knew no more” (260). The actions and dramas were added to grab the audiences’ attention because of the people like more intense, fighting scenes and more romance. The director did a fairly nice job even though Bilbo’s changes throughout the story is hard to see in the movie version, the fighting scenes were amazing and eye-catching and Kili’s sacrifice for Tauriel was extremely depressing.

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One thought on “Are Changes Good or Bad?

  1. Hi Mina! Your hook is very intriguing – “Have you ever had a time when you loved a book, a movie version was finally made, but many parts were changed?” – because it reminded me of watching the Fahrenheit 451 movie. It was pretty different from the book so that the movie would appeal more to the audience- For example, an obvious change was that Clarisse didn’t die. This connects to what you said about the Hobbit movie – “The love triangle between them and Kili (a dwarf) was created to attract the audience” What did you enjoy more- reading the book or watching the movies? Why?

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