An Illustrated Guide to Not Dying During the Alien Apocalypse

In this post, I will be analyzing how the protagonists of the book, The Swarm by Orson Scott Card, solve the conflict. Like any other book, The Swarm has many conflicts, but I decided to choose a larger one: The Formics are coming back for another war, but where are they? And when are they coming? Over the course of the book, Mazer, Bingwen, and Vico’s crew are able to solve all these answers, but can they solve them in time? Below are some quotes detailing their pursues to solve the life-or-death questions, accompanied with cute visuals!

 

 

“Edimar had detected the approaching Formic fleet and alerted the world of the coming second war.” (Card 74)
After the supposed victory of the First Formic War in China, the whole world was in celebration. But Edimar, the same girl who first detected the Formic fleet before the war, saw that a larger “mother-ship” was heading towards Earth. War was inevitable. As soon as the Hegemon heard about this, the whole world was sent into a frenzy: economically and apocalyptically.

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Two 1789s, Which One is Better?

As shown above, I’ve compared pages 19-22 of the novel, The Pale Assassin, by Patricia Elliot, with a textbook called The French Revolution (Heinemann History Study Units) by Peter Mantin. From both texts, I took out the sections that had to deal with the first year of the French Revolution: 1789. When comparing the sentence types in the passages, I noticed that the book had way more sentence variation than the textbook. Peter Mantin describes the history of the French Revolution in short and brief sentences, compared to the beautifully structured sentences of Patricia’s. Because The Pale Assassin centers around a fourteen-year-old noble, you can sense an overall tone of scary or being worried. Also, because the reader is supposed to sympathize with the protagonist, the dialogue was tinged with a little royal bias and child-like innocence. On the other hand, the textbook is objective, teaching you the timeline and events that happened in 1789. Speaking of teaching, since all you need to learn about the French Revolution is the facts, the textbook barely includes any figurative language, other than prepositional phrases that give a sense of date and time. This contrasts the rich words and language in the book — appositive phrases, prepositional phrases, and personification. As well as literary devices, Elliot uses a big range of vocabulary to paint the picture her book depicts. I was disappointed to find out that the textbook did not do this too, as a non-fiction source should be the text that would give you the most detail. But alas, The French Revolution is only meant for you to learn the gist of the history of France, unlike the novel, a historical-fiction genre tale.

Not surprisingly, the two texts have very limited similarities. Both of the passages are about 1789, the period of the first turning points in the revolution. Both do show most of the facts, but this is because they take place in the French Revolution. What more can you get out of it?

 

12 Years a Peasant

In the country of France, located on a small narrow street, there lied an old bakery owned by a husband and wife and their son. They were just like any other family on the street: shop-owners who were not too rich. They were all part of the Third Estate, a huge chunk of the population who had to fight in wars and pay taxes, unlike the First and Second Estates. Unbeknownst to anyone, revolution was coming. Pierre Gabin, a 12 year old boy, son of the baker man, may have been living an ordinary life in 1788, but the boy in the bakery experiences more of the French Revolution than almost everyone else.

Eventually, what did the French Revolution lead to? Not a lot of change, really. But like all revolutions, there had to be some change.

Obviously, the was a HUGE change in the social structure of France. There was no more First, Second and Third Estate, as everyone had more or less the same amount of power and wealth. But alas, that meant everyone was poor. Instead of making the poor people rich, the revolution made the rich people poor. The economy was still horrible: France still was in debt, and bread prices were very high as always. Money wasn’t the only thing that hasn’t changed. France went through multiple stages of governments, all coming with their own faults.  Because Napoleon claimed dictatorship, France is now under control of one person. King Louis is gone, and is replaced by the ‘petite’ war hero. After 10 years of bloody conflict, France had swapped a corrupt sovereign, for another corrupt sovereign. On the also-as equally-not-so-bright side, France’s society was cracked into their own sides after the revolution. The influential Jacobins and Girondins had very different political views during the Reign of Terror, and their opinions did not fade away even after the terror passed.

Overall, the French Revolution was about making life fair for everyone. The Third Estate were the only ones suffering, and wanted to change that. But hey, like the saying, life’s unfair.

A Visual Guide to Liberty, Equality, Fraternity

Why is your revolution important?

The French Revolution was extremely important as the entire government and social system was different at the end of the revolution than the start. From an absolute monarchy to a republic, special privileges to equal treatment, France changed it’s future and development in the world, which was completely unexpected.

What should people realize about your revolution before they watch the video?

Life wasn’t very easy for the Third Estate so they were desperate for another way. It’s not like the Third Estate were just rabid people who were petty and wanted a fancy lifestyle. They wanted equal treatment and privileges for all, whether everyone likes it or not.
What was it like in your country before the revolution?

Before the revolution, France was split into three estates called the First, Second and Third estates, all ruled by King Louis XVI. The First and Second Estates were privileged and had a nice life while the Third Estate paid all the taxes and lived a hungry poor life. Completely unfair right?

What were people fighting for?

The Third Estate could not live their miserable lives forever, so they complained and fought against the other Estates for equal treatment and a constitution for the King. There was the fact that they had to fight in war and pay taxes that paid for the luxurious lifestyle of the First and Second Estate, and that was not cool with the Third Estate that they had to do all that.
What was society like at the time of the revolution?

During most of the revolution, there were revolts and complaining all over France. Violent acts and protests were common. Events included but not limited to like the Storming of Bastille and the March to Versailles were important to the revolution. During the Reign of Terror (1793-1794), millions of people were executed by the Jacobins using the guillotine.