Progress (Passion Project Weekly Update #2)

Hello again! You might be wondering… what have I done this past week?  Well I’d admit, this week has been quite slow but that’s because I had multiple events happening this week. Here’s the whole shebang on what I did this week:]

On Monday, it was my sister’s boyfriend’s birthday so I just HAD to draw a comic to commemorate that. Shortly after that, I made a quick process video on how I drew that cartoon dragon above this text.

Then on Thursday, I celebrated my birthday with a REALLY quick doodle that took about 1 hour to make. Being 14 really doesn’t feel like much of a difference, despite the cartoon depiction.I’ve been working on this piece for the entire week, but I’ve been putting it off every single day. Although seeming like a pathetic joke, it’s based upon my true story of how I spilled a bowl of curry onto my boxers, but virtually doing absolutely nothing because no one would see it in the first place.

This week, I’ve started to ponder on how I can publish my book. Would I need to contact a publisher? Do I need to see if my prints turn out well? What are the dimensions of the book? So I’ve decided to ask the copy center next week on printing a comic out, print book style. For the publisher part, I can either ask the school to publish it, or I could ask Mr. Fidler/anyone else who’s published a book where they did it.

Otherwise, I’m set for this week, and I have a semi-solid plan for what I’m supposed to do next week. Still, I churn out some comics and artworks from the ol’ cartoon machine.

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Written With Passion

Our group has best magazine because we have the best team and rose to the challenge together. I am extremely proud of our teamwork and collaboration, because in the end, our magazine turned out to be WAY more aesthetic and legit than I thought! Personally, I’m very harsh on myself, but I have to admit, that magazine was kick-butt amazing. Although our group was probably the best group that I could ever ask for, I do have some regrets during this project. One major setback for me, was the deleting the photos I took during the Chinese Ethic Park trip. How stupid was I, when I deleted those photos in the trash can, thinking that we wouldn’t need to use them; fortunately, I had saved enough photos to get myself through the final project. A lesson that I learned is that constant communication is the key to constant success. Through our process of checking in on each other once in a while, we were all able to contribute and share ideas to the final project, and in the end when we put it all together, all the sections fit beautifully. All in all, if you would ask me if I wanted to do another project just like this, I would be a total 10/10.

An Illustrated Guide to Not Dying During the Alien Apocalypse

In this post, I will be analyzing how the protagonists of the book, The Swarm by Orson Scott Card, solve the conflict. Like any other book, The Swarm has many conflicts, but I decided to choose a larger one: The Formics are coming back for another war, but where are they? And when are they coming? Over the course of the book, Mazer, Bingwen, and Vico’s crew are able to solve all these answers, but can they solve them in time? Below are some quotes detailing their pursues to solve the life-or-death questions, accompanied with cute visuals!

 

 

“Edimar had detected the approaching Formic fleet and alerted the world of the coming second war.” (Card 74)
After the supposed victory of the First Formic War in China, the whole world was in celebration. But Edimar, the same girl who first detected the Formic fleet before the war, saw that a larger “mother-ship” was heading towards Earth. War was inevitable. As soon as the Hegemon heard about this, the whole world was sent into a frenzy: economically and apocalyptically.

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Two 1789s, Which One is Better?

As shown above, I’ve compared pages 19-22 of the novel, The Pale Assassin, by Patricia Elliot, with a textbook called The French Revolution (Heinemann History Study Units) by Peter Mantin. From both texts, I took out the sections that had to deal with the first year of the French Revolution: 1789. When comparing the sentence types in the passages, I noticed that the book had way more sentence variation than the textbook. Peter Mantin describes the history of the French Revolution in short and brief sentences, compared to the beautifully structured sentences of Patricia’s. Because The Pale Assassin centers around a fourteen-year-old noble, you can sense an overall tone of scary or being worried. Also, because the reader is supposed to sympathize with the protagonist, the dialogue was tinged with a little royal bias and child-like innocence. On the other hand, the textbook is objective, teaching you the timeline and events that happened in 1789. Speaking of teaching, since all you need to learn about the French Revolution is the facts, the textbook barely includes any figurative language, other than prepositional phrases that give a sense of date and time. This contrasts the rich words and language in the book — appositive phrases, prepositional phrases, and personification. As well as literary devices, Elliot uses a big range of vocabulary to paint the picture her book depicts. I was disappointed to find out that the textbook did not do this too, as a non-fiction source should be the text that would give you the most detail. But alas, The French Revolution is only meant for you to learn the gist of the history of France, unlike the novel, a historical-fiction genre tale.

Not surprisingly, the two texts have very limited similarities. Both of the passages are about 1789, the period of the first turning points in the revolution. Both do show most of the facts, but this is because they take place in the French Revolution. What more can you get out of it?

 

12 Years a Peasant

In the country of France, located on a small narrow street, there lied an old bakery owned by a husband and wife and their son. They were just like any other family on the street: shop-owners who were not too rich. They were all part of the Third Estate, a huge chunk of the population who had to fight in wars and pay taxes, unlike the First and Second Estates. Unbeknownst to anyone, revolution was coming. Pierre Gabin, a 12 year old boy, son of the baker man, may have been living an ordinary life in 1788, but the boy in the bakery experiences more of the French Revolution than almost everyone else.

Eventually, what did the French Revolution lead to? Not a lot of change, really. But like all revolutions, there had to be some change.

Obviously, the was a HUGE change in the social structure of France. There was no more First, Second and Third Estate, as everyone had more or less the same amount of power and wealth. But alas, that meant everyone was poor. Instead of making the poor people rich, the revolution made the rich people poor. The economy was still horrible: France still was in debt, and bread prices were very high as always. Money wasn’t the only thing that hasn’t changed. France went through multiple stages of governments, all coming with their own faults.  Because Napoleon claimed dictatorship, France is now under control of one person. King Louis is gone, and is replaced by the ‘petite’ war hero. After 10 years of bloody conflict, France had swapped a corrupt sovereign, for another corrupt sovereign. On the also-as equally-not-so-bright side, France’s society was cracked into their own sides after the revolution. The influential Jacobins and Girondins had very different political views during the Reign of Terror, and their opinions did not fade away even after the terror passed.

Overall, the French Revolution was about making life fair for everyone. The Third Estate were the only ones suffering, and wanted to change that. But hey, like the saying, life’s unfair.

Meme 2.0

For this post, I decided to create a summary of MILA 2.0 by Debra Driza up until the climax using memes. By mixing classic, Twitter, and recent trending memes, here’s the gist of what happens in the exposition and rising action of the former physical therapist’s book.

Warning: SPOILERS AHEAD

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From Thin Air

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The non-fiction book that I’m reading is The Boy Who Fell Out of the Sky by Ken Dornstein. The plot of the book is protagonist Ken Dornstein unearthing his brother’s past. Ken’s brother, David, died in the crash of Pan Am Flight 103, right in the small town in Lockerbie on December 21, 1988. The cause? A terrorist bombing that was planned about 10 years before. That day, 270 innocent people died, and some of them weren’t even on the plane. Fortunately, people were held responsible and were judged in court on May 2000. Ken Dornstein wrote this book to commemorate his brother and reflect on his life before and after the life-changing incident.

I created a little poster-art to show the central idea of the book. Using 4 quotes, I supported the idea as well as providing explanations for the quotes. (See image attached above)

Clipper Maid of the Seas photo: “Pan Am Flight 103.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation, 7 Dec. 2016. Web. 08 Dec. 2016.

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Finding Dory… and Letting Her Go

The Bass, The River, and Sheila Mant Found Poem

The found poem comes from the short story “The Bass, The River, and Sheila Mant” page 4. It was written by W. D. Wetherell. The story is about the protagonist explaining how he took the love of his life onto a date on his boat, but catches the biggest large mouth bass ever in his life. Over the course of the story he struggles on whether to choose the girl and let the fish go, or catch the fish and ruin the date. In the end, he chooses the girl, Sheila, and cuts the fishing line, letting the fish go. Overall the conflict was internal. The protagonist spent the entire date deciding which to choose, until finally at the climax, he cut the fishing line.

My found poem shows this by repeating the words Sheila and the bass multiple times, highlighting the indecision. The artwork in my poem shows the bass being caught from the water, and the artwork also shows that how I chose specific word from the short story, creating a found poem.