12 Years a Peasant

In the country of France, located on a small narrow street, there lied an old bakery owned by a husband and wife and their son. They were just like any other family on the street: shop-owners who were not too rich. They were all part of the Third Estate, a huge chunk of the population who had to fight in wars and pay taxes, unlike the First and Second Estates. Unbeknownst to anyone, revolution was coming. Pierre Gabin, a 12 year old boy, son of the baker man, may have been living an ordinary life in 1788, but the boy in the bakery experiences more of the French Revolution than almost everyone else.

Eventually, what did the French Revolution lead to? Not a lot of change, really. But like all revolutions, there had to be some change.

Obviously, the was a HUGE change in the social structure of France. There was no more First, Second and Third Estate, as everyone had more or less the same amount of power and wealth. But alas, that meant everyone was poor. Instead of making the poor people rich, the revolution made the rich people poor. The economy was still horrible: France still was in debt, and bread prices were very high as always. Money wasn’t the only thing that hasn’t changed. France went through multiple stages of governments, all coming with their own faults.  Because Napoleon claimed dictatorship, France is now under control of one person. King Louis is gone, and is replaced by the ‘petite’ war hero. After 10 years of bloody conflict, France had swapped a corrupt sovereign, for another corrupt sovereign. On the also-as equally-not-so-bright side, France’s society was cracked into their own sides after the revolution. The influential Jacobins and Girondins had very different political views during the Reign of Terror, and their opinions did not fade away even after the terror passed.

Overall, the French Revolution was about making life fair for everyone. The Third Estate were the only ones suffering, and wanted to change that. But hey, like the saying, life’s unfair.

Finding Dory… and Letting Her Go

The Bass, The River, and Sheila Mant Found Poem

The found poem comes from the short story “The Bass, The River, and Sheila Mant” page 4. It was written by W. D. Wetherell. The story is about the protagonist explaining how he took the love of his life onto a date on his boat, but catches the biggest large mouth bass ever in his life. Over the course of the story he struggles on whether to choose the girl and let the fish go, or catch the fish and ruin the date. In the end, he chooses the girl, Sheila, and cuts the fishing line, letting the fish go. Overall the conflict was internal. The protagonist spent the entire date deciding which to choose, until finally at the climax, he cut the fishing line.

My found poem shows this by repeating the words Sheila and the bass multiple times, highlighting the indecision. The artwork in my poem shows the bass being caught from the water, and the artwork also shows that how I chose specific word from the short story, creating a found poem.