Written With Passion

Our group has best magazine because we have the best team and rose to the challenge together. I am extremely proud of our teamwork and collaboration, because in the end, our magazine turned out to be WAY more aesthetic and legit than I thought! Personally, I’m very harsh on myself, but I have to admit, that magazine was kick-butt amazing. Although our group was probably the best group that I could ever ask for, I do have some regrets during this project. One major setback for me, was the deleting the photos I took during the Chinese Ethic Park trip. How stupid was I, when I deleted those photos in the trash can, thinking that we wouldn’t need to use them; fortunately, I had saved enough photos to get myself through the final project. A lesson that I learned is that constant communication is the key to constant success. Through our process of checking in on each other once in a while, we were all able to contribute and share ideas to the final project, and in the end when we put it all together, all the sections fit beautifully. All in all, if you would ask me if I wanted to do another project just like this, I would be a total 10/10.

An Illustrated Guide to Not Dying During the Alien Apocalypse

In this post, I will be analyzing how the protagonists of the book, The Swarm by Orson Scott Card, solve the conflict. Like any other book, The Swarm has many conflicts, but I decided to choose a larger one: The Formics are coming back for another war, but where are they? And when are they coming? Over the course of the book, Mazer, Bingwen, and Vico’s crew are able to solve all these answers, but can they solve them in time? Below are some quotes detailing their pursues to solve the life-or-death questions, accompanied with cute visuals!

 

 

“Edimar had detected the approaching Formic fleet and alerted the world of the coming second war.” (Card 74)
After the supposed victory of the First Formic War in China, the whole world was in celebration. But Edimar, the same girl who first detected the Formic fleet before the war, saw that a larger “mother-ship” was heading towards Earth. War was inevitable. As soon as the Hegemon heard about this, the whole world was sent into a frenzy: economically and apocalyptically.

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Two 1789s, Which One is Better?

As shown above, I’ve compared pages 19-22 of the novel, The Pale Assassin, by Patricia Elliot, with a textbook called The French Revolution (Heinemann History Study Units) by Peter Mantin. From both texts, I took out the sections that had to deal with the first year of the French Revolution: 1789. When comparing the sentence types in the passages, I noticed that the book had way more sentence variation than the textbook. Peter Mantin describes the history of the French Revolution in short and brief sentences, compared to the beautifully structured sentences of Patricia’s. Because The Pale Assassin centers around a fourteen-year-old noble, you can sense an overall tone of scary or being worried. Also, because the reader is supposed to sympathize with the protagonist, the dialogue was tinged with a little royal bias and child-like innocence. On the other hand, the textbook is objective, teaching you the timeline and events that happened in 1789. Speaking of teaching, since all you need to learn about the French Revolution is the facts, the textbook barely includes any figurative language, other than prepositional phrases that give a sense of date and time. This contrasts the rich words and language in the book — appositive phrases, prepositional phrases, and personification. As well as literary devices, Elliot uses a big range of vocabulary to paint the picture her book depicts. I was disappointed to find out that the textbook did not do this too, as a non-fiction source should be the text that would give you the most detail. But alas, The French Revolution is only meant for you to learn the gist of the history of France, unlike the novel, a historical-fiction genre tale.

Not surprisingly, the two texts have very limited similarities. Both of the passages are about 1789, the period of the first turning points in the revolution. Both do show most of the facts, but this is because they take place in the French Revolution. What more can you get out of it?

 

12 Years a Peasant

In the country of France, located on a small narrow street, there lied an old bakery owned by a husband and wife and their son. They were just like any other family on the street: shop-owners who were not too rich. They were all part of the Third Estate, a huge chunk of the population who had to fight in wars and pay taxes, unlike the First and Second Estates. Unbeknownst to anyone, revolution was coming. Pierre Gabin, a 12 year old boy, son of the baker man, may have been living an ordinary life in 1788, but the boy in the bakery experiences more of the French Revolution than almost everyone else.

Eventually, what did the French Revolution lead to? Not a lot of change, really. But like all revolutions, there had to be some change.

Obviously, the was a HUGE change in the social structure of France. There was no more First, Second and Third Estate, as everyone had more or less the same amount of power and wealth. But alas, that meant everyone was poor. Instead of making the poor people rich, the revolution made the rich people poor. The economy was still horrible: France still was in debt, and bread prices were very high as always. Money wasn’t the only thing that hasn’t changed. France went through multiple stages of governments, all coming with their own faults.  Because Napoleon claimed dictatorship, France is now under control of one person. King Louis is gone, and is replaced by the ‘petite’ war hero. After 10 years of bloody conflict, France had swapped a corrupt sovereign, for another corrupt sovereign. On the also-as equally-not-so-bright side, France’s society was cracked into their own sides after the revolution. The influential Jacobins and Girondins had very different political views during the Reign of Terror, and their opinions did not fade away even after the terror passed.

Overall, the French Revolution was about making life fair for everyone. The Third Estate were the only ones suffering, and wanted to change that. But hey, like the saying, life’s unfair.

Lost and Found Secrets

ad-1ad-2  ad-3For my blog post, I decided to create 3 print ads that represent motifs that support the theme of Lost Luggage by Jordi Punti and as clearly stated in all 3 ads, the theme is “everyone has a reason to keep their own secrets”. The ads are meant to convince people to read the book, and I tried to do that by partially revealing some secrets that would lure in readers who are curious or want to learn more.

***SPOILERS***

Ad #1 details a mother no longer being able to bear the pain of a lost child. Instead of moving on, she masked with the sadness by adopting another child, 9-year-old Gabriel, and naming him after her dead son Cristóbal. Soon after adoption, newly named Cristóbal discovered about his predecessor and unwittingly confronts his “mother” with her secret.

Ad #2 is about how 18-year-old Conrad, who suffered from early age baldness, hid his wig from his father who is a barber. Being a barber, Martí should’ve had a natural strong dislike towards wigs and toupees and that was exactly what caused his son Conrad to hide his top-secret toupee.

Finally, Ad #3 represents Gabriel, 30 years after abandoning them after birth, meeting his four sons after they rescued him from gamblers. He reveals to them that he was afraid to talk or even meet them as he was sure that the Christophers had a passionate hatred towards him. So, he hid… just a couple of meters away in the room right next to the Christopher’s headquarters for tracking down their father.

When these print ads’ subtexts (motifs) are put together, it should stick the theme into your head. If not, then read the book. If the motifs of the theme sound interesting, read the book. If you’re not sure on whether to read the book, read it.

Photo credit: tomorca <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/94059371@N04/30116456831″>Symbol tree</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=“https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/”>(license)</a>

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Easy Reads: Bean’s Buddy Blowout


I chose to rewrite “Shadow of the Hegemon” by Orson Scott Card as a rhyming 4-7 year-old children’s book. The theme, hold on to the people you love and care, or else you may find it to be too late, was expressed in the book by [spoilers!] the death of Bean’s friends. I tried to keep the main plot, which was Bean in hiding, trying to rescue his friends especially Petra from the clutches of Achilles the antagonist in the adaptation and also tried to make the theme obvious by also stating it in the end, which nicely flows in the children’s version.

 

Slideshow made with: Slidesnack

Latest Version Of My New Story

The Story Story

By Austin Li

 

The following warnings are not to be criticized and should be followed with strictest laws. Any violation shall end badly for you, and the writing crew shall not take any credit for loss or damage.

 

This story is purely made up. Any criticism towards anybody and to you is totally coincidental. If this is torrented (even though this is a document and I know,) who cares? I am not selling it; but if you’re willing…

Anyways, since what you are about to read is not a story, I am going to tell you what this ‘story’ is all about. It is about a story within a story, where a writer is writing to finish writing down the story in the story. Then, someone reads the out-story and the writer realizes that, and creates a story about the reader. So sit back a relax, as the story unfolds with things that you do not want to read!

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Post #11: Writers Circle 2 Story Draft

 

On the 24th night of December, David was just putting up the final decorations for Christmas. Along with the red and green lights and the tall-standing tree, hidden on the bottom of the chimney was a snare net. The cookies and milk were drugged with sleep serum, and the tree was lined with exploding ornaments.

 

David had never been a big fan of Santa. In fact, he might’ve hated him! His parents had died when he was just 7. Ever since, he had never received gifts from him. Every Christmas, he would get a piece of paper saying, it’s not my fault. He lived in a foster-home, with 12 other kids! Now, he has grown-up and wants to take out revenge on Santa. Continue reading

Post #5: My Opinion PEEL Paragraph

I think that kids should not be making thought notes or something like the Action, Words, So What.

First of all, the hardest thing to do is to lose the book, write down your thoughts and get into your book. I bet everyone reluctantly closes their book to write down their first thought because if they don’t they have to fill out slip for why you didn’t do homework. It’s easy to get lost in a good book but once you write down a thought, your brain goes on to focus for those possible questions, and you don’t actually ‘read’ the book anymore, your just looking for thoughts that can come up. Finally, everyone can do mentally, it’s just that teachers want you to do it so that you might not forget it the next day.
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Post #3 My Writers Circle Story

At the airport, Phillip woke up with the familiar roar of the engine and g-force pressing against his chest. Finally, they were taking off. When they got into the air, immediately the plane lurched to the right, which caused the plane to fall a few feet. A few cries broke out but the plane steadied itself and rose into the clouds. The speaker came on, and a voice came out, though it wasn’t completely a voice. It was a harsh metallic sound, mixed with the hums of a human. Almost like choking out word from a robot.

*SORRY FOR THE TURBULENCE* choked the speaker.

It was then, where Phillip got suspicious. Before Phillip moved to Shirland, he lived in his family’s home home. His family was so rich, that every member of the family had their own mini-house. As Phillip grew up over the past 11 years, he had always wanted to be detective Finding out clues or discovering a mystery was a perfect match for his mysterious character. As the flight attendants served lunch, the plane swerved wildly the side again, this time to the left. The plane then recollected itself like the first time, and the same scratchy voice came over the speaker. Continue reading